17

SAT 00:00 Midnight News (m000x7vz)
The latest news and weather forecast from BBC Radio 4.

In the last episode of Arctic Dreams, read by Kyle Soller, Lopez considers how man’s relationship with the frozen north has changed over time and exhorts us to rise to the ever more urgent challenges of climate change and to cherish and protect this most fragile of continents. As industry encroaches ever further into the polar regions Lopez insists we must not regard the Arctic merely as a resource for us to exploit.

In his breath-taking natural, social and cultural history of the Arctic, Lopez reveals the essential mystery and beauty of a continent that has enchanted man’s imagination and ambition since time immemorial.
Written well over a quarter of a century ago, Lopez’s visionary account of his journey across the polar caps is a celebration of the Arctic in all its guises. A hostile landscape of ice, freezing oceans and dazzling skyscapes, home to millions of diverse animals and people, it is also the backdrop to massive migrations by land, sea and air and the setting of epic exploratory voyages.

In timeless, prophetic prose, as meditative and memorable as the land it describes, Arctic Dreams poses fundamental questions about how we should cherish our ever more vulnerable planet.
Arctic Dreams was written by Barry Lopez.
It is read by Kyle Soller and abridged by Richard Hamilton
The producer is Karen Holden

SAT 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m000x7w3)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.

SAT 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m000x7w5)
BBC Radio 4 presents a selection of news and current affairs, arts and science programmes from the BBC World Service.

SAT 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m000x7w7)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.

SAT 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m000x7wc)
Radio 4’s daily prayer and reflection. Producer: Mo McCullough/Ailsa McIntosh

Dr. Tamsin Ellis is a GP who looks for ways to improve her patients’ health and the environment.

Welcoming us into her consulting room to meet her patients, Tamsin describes her journey to climate activism, and why she’s convinced that looking for ‘double wins’ is the way forward. From giving a lecture about the environment to a sea of faces all sipping coffee from plastic cups, to the challenges of winning over already hard-pressed colleagues, in this witty talk Tamsin describes the realities of climate activism on the NHS frontline. As she prescribes health interventions with positive side-effects for the planet, she offers a new way to talk about climate change.

Tamsin is introduced by host Olly Mann.

SAT 06:00 News and Papers (m000xdf3)
The latest news headlines. Including the weather and a look at the papers.

Monique Gudgeon is on a mission to create a botanic garden. And what better way to get started than to build a new National Plant Collection. In creating a garden from scratch, one of her priorities is to bring in species which both work with the surrounding Dorset landscape and that are in need of conservation. There is a huge diversity of garden plants that need to be looked after so cultivars aren’t lost when they go out of fashion. National Plant Collections were created by the charity Plant Heritage to ensure these plants are preserved and documented for the future.

Of the plant groups that don’t currently have a custodian, Monique decided to choose forsythia – deciduous shrubs often overlooked as just a hedging plant which burst into vibrant yellow flowers in early spring. In the process of sourcing and propagating all the varieties needed for a collection, Monique has become utterly fascinated by them and their history.

Helen Mark hears the story of Monique’s successes and failures so far, and explores what it takes to build and maintain a National Plant Collection. We also meet people behind other collections and hear what drives their particular fascination with a group of plants, and how they fit in to their landscapes.

SAT 06:30 Farming Today (m000xdf5)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside

SAT 07:00 Today (m000xdf9)
Including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.

SAT 09:00 Saturday Live (m000xdff)
Radio 4’s Saturday morning show brings you extraordinary stories and remarkable people.

SAT 10:30 Rewinder (m000xdfh)
Greg James, host of the Radio 1 Breakfast show and self-confessed ‘proud radio nerd’, uses his access-all-areas pass to the BBC Archives to track down audio gems, using listener requests and current stories as a springboard into the vast vaults of past programmes.

This week, a request starts a search for possible fakes in the archives: in the last series Greg played a scratchy recording, apparently from 1890, of the poet Tennyson reading his Charge of the Light Brigade – but was it the real thing or a cunningly constructed counterfeit, dating from the early 1960s? And was a renowned British film director responsible for this trickery?

Other listener requests include early appearances by the comedian Linda Smith, and Greg finds Amy Winehouse launching her career, with interviews on programmes including Woman’s Hour.

Greg also looks back at the disastrous opening night of BBC2, when calamitous power cuts stopped the transmission of the planned launch programming, leaving presenters and producers trying to find their way around Television Centre using candles and torches.

SAT 11:00 The Week in Westminster (m000xdfk)
Radio 4’s assessment of developments at Westminster

SAT 11:30 From Our Own Correspondent (m000xdfm)
Insight, wit and analysis from BBC correspondents, journalists and writers from around the world

SAT 12:00 News Summary (m000xdl2)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4

SAT 12:04 Money Box (m000xdfr)
The latest news from the world of personal finance

The writing squad for the series: Tom Jamieson and Nev Fountain, Laurence Howarth, Tom Coles & Ed Amsden, Jeffrey Aidoo, Simon Alcock, James Bugg, Sarah Campbell, Nastassia Dhanraj , Athena Kugblenu, Sophie Dickson, Rajiv Karia, Vivienne Riddoch & Jane Mccutcheon , Edward Tew.

Producer: Bill Dare
Production Coordinator: Sarah Sharpe
A BBC Studios Production for Radio 4.

SAT 13:00 News and Weather (m000xdfw)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4

Chris Mason presents political discussion from Christ Church in Winchester with a panel which includes the GB News presenter Alastair Stewart and the Shadow International Trade Secretary Emily Thornberry MP.
Producer: Camellia Sinclair
Lead broadcast engineer: Tim Allen

SAT 14:00 Any Answers? (m000xdfy)
Have your say on the issues discussed on Any Questions?

SAT 14:45 One to One (m000vwqk)
Tech for Good: Marcus Smith speaks to Kriti Sharma

What do you think of when you hear the words “A.I.” or “Artificial Intelligence”? Thanks to science-fiction it’s often strange-looking humanoids or futuristic robots hell-bent on destruction. But as Kriti Sharma points out, we are probably using A.I. hundreds of times a day without even thinking about it. It could be, she says, a bank deciding whether to accept or reject your application, or an algorithm might decide whether you get a job interview or what exam grade you receieve. She made her first robot when she was a teenager, and has gone on to use A.I. to help the victims of domestic abuse and to challenge the rise of what she sees as subservient female online assistants. Kriti is now an advisor on A.I. to the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport.

Marcus Smith is a content creator from Bristol and a digital native. He is fascinated by technology’s impact on us and has studied the effects of online gambling on young people. For ‘One to One’, Marcus is looking at the ‘tech for good’ movement and speaks to two leading figures in the tech industry – one who argues that it is currently a force for bad, and one who tries to work with tech to harness the good.

For this second programme, Marcus asks Kriti why she thinks A.I. often has in-built gender and race biases, and hears how she is tackling this by inviting more people from varied backgrounds into the design process.

Hawk Wounded: Albert the One-Eyed of Habsburg has displaced Norbert and become Holy Roman Emperor, but Wenceslas plots revenge. Disappointed by his philosophical son, Albert takes John of Swabia into his inner circle and Ibrahim settles an old score.

Mike Walker’s epic chronicle of the Habsburg dynasty which was to rule most of Europe – as well as much of the New World – for 600 years.

BBC Cymru Wales production.

SAT 17:30 Political Thinking with Nick Robinson (m000xdg4)
Nick Robinson talks about what’s really going on in British politics.

SAT 17:54 Shipping Forecast (m000xdg6)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.

SAT 18:00 Six O’Clock News (m000xdgb)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4

SAT 18:15 Loose Ends (m000xdgd)
Tim Minchin, Karin Slaughter, Jenny Seagrove, Amanda Wilkin, The Glare, Attawalpa, Clive Anderson

Clive Anderson is joined by Tim Minchin, Karin Slaughter, Jenny Seagrove and Amanda Wilkin for an eclectic mix of conversation, music and comedy. With music from The Glare and Attawalpa.

SAT 19:00 Profile (m000xdgg)
An insight into the character of an influential person making the news headlines

The light hearted interview show where Victoria Coren Mitchell interviews a well known woman about the cars she has known and uses them as a vehicle to talk about her life. This week Esther Rantzen tells the story of her journey from her first memories of her grandmother’s sedate Hawker Siddely limousine through to the intensity of the That’s Life years and helming one of the nation’s most popular television programmes through to the joys of becoming a grandmother herself. And you can find out what no driving test examiner should ever say to a successful candidate.
With contributions from the audience and readings by Morwenna Banks.
Produced by Gareth Edwards

A BBC Studios production.

Rory Sutherland explores perhaps the most influential and successful charitable campaign of recent times: the Motor Neurone Disease / ALS Ice Bucket Challenge. Spread virally by social media, yet decried by some as mere vanity and “slacktivism”, the campaign nevertheless proved hugely valuable to both the fight against disease, and understanding attitudes to altruism in the age of Facebook.

We hear powerful testimonies from the families who created it, with insights into our attitudes to giving unravelled by experimental psychologist Nichola Raihani, one of the UK’s leading experts in altruism.

Why do certain marketing campaigns – from Nike’s “Just Do It” to the MND Ice Bucket Challenge – cast such a spell over us? Rory Sutherland explores the story – and the psychology – behind ten of the most influential campaigns in history – with first-hand accounts from the creative minds that conceived them, and contributions from the worlds of evolutionary biology, behavioural psychology, socio-economics and anthropology.

Marketing. It’s come to be one of the most misunderstood – and maligned – disciplines of our age: perceived variously as the Emperor’s New Clothes, an emblem of the ills of capitalism, a shadowy dark art designed to steal away our hard-earned money and make us do (or buy, or vote for) things we don’t want.

Yet marketing is undeniably a key part of contemporary culture. It’s a science that’s fundamentally about human behaviour – marketers, to some extent, understand us better than we know ourselves – and in the most successful campaigns we find our deepest emotions and urges, from altruism to shame, hope to bravado, systematically tapped into and drawn upon.

But what are these primal behaviours that the best campaigns evoke in us – and how do they harness them? Is marketing purely about commercial gain or can it underpin real common good and societal progress? And does the discipline manipulate our subconscious instincts and emotions – or simply hold a mirror to them?

Over ten episodes, senior advertising creative and Spectator writer Rory Sutherland unravels the story of some of the most powerful, brilliant and influential campaigns of our age. Set alongside personal testimonies from the brilliant minds that created them, we’ll hear from a host of experts – from biologists to philosophers, novelists to economists – about how these campaigns got under our skin and proved to be so influential.

Contributors include: writer and former copywriter Fay Weldon; social behaviourist and expert on altruism Nicola Raihani; Alexander Nix, CEO of big data analysts Cambridge Analytica; philosopher Andy Martin; writer on Islamic issues and advisor to the world’s first Islamic branding consultancy, Shelina Janmohamed; and evolutionary psychologist Geoffrey Miler.

While the history of electronic music includes many notable men whose stories have been frequently celebrated, the genre has also provided a space for a wide range of extraordinary women to create a musical room of their own.

Working with machines meant being able to sidestep many of the hurdles that stood in the way of women aspiring to a musical career, such as access to orchestras, commissions and concert halls, and an over-riding failure to be taken seriously by the male musical gate-keepers. Elizabeth Alker examines the connections between early pioneers such as Eliane Radigue and Daphne Oram (who gained access to studios thanks to the second world war), those musicians who followed in their immediate wake such as Suzanne Ciani and Laurie Spiegel, and today’s generation of female composers.

Anna Meredith, Holly Herndon, Afrodeutsche and JLin all speak with Elizabeth about their own work and the debt they owe their predecessors. Central to the story is the composer and academic Pauline Oliveros, who founded the San Francisco Tape Music Centre, and whose theories around deep-listening as a feminist act shape so much of the texture of the music created by the women and men who followed her.

This is music, Elizabeth argues, which has an emphasis on tone and texture. This lends it a particular quality making it both distinct from its male equivalent and also profoundly beautiful and rich.

Presenter: Elizabeth Alker
Producer: Geoff Bird
A Tempo & Talker production for BBC Radio 4

William Palmer must do what he can to prevent the marriage of Mr Delancey’s daughter to the King of the Greyfolk. But the king has laid his plans…

Pilgrim ….. Paul Hilton
Delancey ….. David Schofield
Mr Hibbens ….. Joe Kloska
Moira ….. Carolyn Pickles
India ….. Scarlett Brookes
Frank ….. Nick Underwood
Boris ….. Ewan Bailey
Zach ….. Sean Baker
Leila ….. Nicola Ferguson

Anne-Marie Duff continues Daisy Johnson’s series of deliciously unsettling ghost stories, set in a remote hotel on the Fens.

Today, in ‘Infestation”, it is the late 1960s, and a young girl is staying at the Hotel with her parents. Bored and restless, she decides to explore…

Writer: Daisy Johnson is a British novelist and short story writer. Her debut novel, Everything Under, was shortlisted for the 2018 Man Booker Prize, making her the youngest nominee in the prize’s history.
Reader: Anne-Marie Duff
Producer: Justine Willett

SAT 22:00 News (m000xdgl)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4

SAT 22:15 Moral Maze (m000x4x2)
Combative, provocative and engaging live debate chaired by Michael Buerk. With Melanie Phillips, Ash Sarkar, Tim Stanley and Matthew Taylor. #moralmaze

A funny, lively and dynamic quiz presented by Steve Punt and recorded on location at a different university each week, pitting three undergraduates against three of their professors. This week the show comes from the Anglia Ruskin University.

The rounds vary between specialist subjects and general knowledge, quickfire bell-and-buzzer rounds and the Highbrow and Lowbrow round cunningly devised to test not only the students’ knowledge of current affairs, history, languages and science, but also their Professors’ awareness of television, sport, and quite possibly Ed Sheeran. And the Head-to-Head rounds, in which students take on their Professors in their own subjects, offer plenty of scope for mild embarrassment on both sides.

The specialist subjects this week are Sociology, Optometry and Psychology – and it’s your chance to find out about the Pole Of Ignorance, the Tumbling E and a CGI lion.

The other universities in this series are Southampton, Nottingham Trent, Northampton, Brasenose College Oxford and Cumbria.

Poet Yomi Sode shares a selection of his favourite poems, including Roger Robinson, Sinéad Morrissey, Casey Bailey and Raymond Carver. Yomi also reads a poem from his upcoming collection MANORISM, which explores fatherhood and masculinity.

SUNDAY 27 JUNE 2021

SUN 00:00 Midnight News (m000xdgn)
The latest news and weather forecast from BBC Radio 4.

SUN 00:30 From Fact to Fiction (m000x7v7)
Award-winning writer Julia Blackburn creates a fictional response to a news story.

Julia has been described as one of the most original writers in Britain. Her work includes ‘Timesong’ a ‘magical, mesmerising book that makes you feel giddy at the thought of the deep gulf of history hidden just beneath your feet’; the winner of the J R Ackerley Award for Memoir for the ‘remarkable’ ‘The Three of Us’, as well as innovative, imaginative and revelatory biographies of Goya, Napoleon and Billie Holliday.

Producer…Mary Ward-Lowery

SUN 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m000xdgq)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.

SUN 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m000xdgs)
BBC Radio 4 presents a selection of news and current affairs, arts and science programmes from the BBC World Service.

SUN 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m000xdgv)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.

SUN 05:30 News Briefing (m000xdgx)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4

SUN 05:43 Bells on Sunday (m000xdgz)
The church of St Mary’s, Bitton in Gloucestershire.

Bells on Sunday comes from the church of St Mary’s, Bitton in Gloucestershire. In 1821 the Vicar, the Reverend Henry Ellacombe, devised and installed a novel apparatus enabling the six bells of St Mary’s to be chimed by a single ringer that can still be seen today in the church porch. In 1936 the old bells were retuned and augmented by Taylors of Loughborough to become a ring of eight bells with a tenor weighing fourteen and a quarter hundredweight and tuned to E. We hear them ringing Call Changes on eight bells.

SUN 05:45 Profile (m000xdgg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]

SUN 06:00 News Summary (m000xdrn)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4

SUN 06:05 Something Understood (b04n2fmh)
Embracing The Classical

Luciano Pavarotti said it was “so important at a young age to be invited to embrace classical music and opera.” Mark Tully and composer James MacMillan discuss the cross-cultural benefits of sharing classical traditions with new audiences and the power of music to unite.

The two first met during the BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra’s tour of India earlier this year. Most of the music in this programme is taken from those concerts, as well as from the family concerts which accompanied them, where young audiences got their first introduction to Western classical traditions.

Mark and James compare the classical traditions of East and West and consider the exciting opportunities for music in a new global culture.

With music by Bizet, Schoenberg and Tchaikovsky and readings from Coleridge, Joyce Grenfell and Alice Herz-Sommer.

The readers are Jane Whittenshaw, David Westhead and Francis Cadder.

Produced by Frank Stirling
A Unique production for BBC Radio 4

SUN 06:35 Natural Histories (b05w99j5)
Sharks

Who can hear the word shark and not the music from the film Jaws? This 1975 film, based on a book from the previous year, is defined as a “watershed moment for sharks.” From being little thought about by most people sharks were suddenly propelled into the lime light as fearsome, ruthless killers whose intent was to harm us humans. An entertaining film became the death warrant for millions of sharks. Our terminology is not helpful.

We find it impossible to speak about sharks without using emotive language: seas are “infested,” sharks “menace” they “cruise around looking for a victim, they “invade” our swimming beaches etc. Crooks are “loan sharks.”

In Hawaiian culture they are often seen as protectors or brave fighters in battle.

We have a difficult relationship with sharks. We have traded their teeth and eaten their fins, so much so that millions are now killed annually for this delicacy for the aristocracy. Damien Hurst has tried to capture the fear of the shark in his famous tank, allowing the viewer to stand next to an open mouth without being in danger. We will always be challenged by this supreme predator, if we allow it to survive in the wild.

SUN 06:57 Weather (m000xdrr)
The latest weather reports and forecast

SUN 07:00 News and Papers (m000xdrt)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.

SUN 07:10 Sunday (m000xdrw)
A look at the ethical and religious issues of the week

SUN 07:54 Radio 4 Appeal (m000xdry)
Sightsavers

Actress Sunetra Sarker makes the Radio 4 Appeal on behalf of Sightsavers.

To Give:
– Freephone 0800 404 8144
– Freepost BBC Radio 4 Appeal. (That’s the whole address. Please do not write anything else on the front of the envelope). Mark the back of the envelope ‘Sightsavers’.
– Cheques should be made payable to ‘Sightsavers’.
– You can donate online at bbc.co.uk/appeal/radio4

Registered Charity Number: 207544

SUN 07:57 Weather (m000xds0)
The latest weather reports and forecast

SUN 08:00 News and Papers (m000xds2)
The latest news headlines. Including a look at the papers.

SUN 08:10 Sunday Worship (m000xds4)
Exile and Return

A service from Rugby School which explores the parallels between the experience of those in education during the Coronavirus pandemic in the UK and themes of exile and return in the bible.

The readings follow the Israelites’ conquest by Babylon, the exile, their protection by God during times of despair and loss, the unity of the community, the promise of return, and the rebuilding of Jerusalem. The School’s Chaplain reflects on parallels with the national experience over the last 18 months; those – for many – of loss, fear, sacrifice, community cohesion, hope, restoration, and rebuilding.

The music is led by the Temple Consort, and includes the hymns ‘I vow to thee my country’ and Jerusalem, and the lessons and prayers are read by members of the School community.

Leader: The Reverend Richard Horner; Director of Music: Richard Tanner; Organist: James Williams; Producer: Ben Collingwood.

SUN 08:48 A Point of View (m000x7vr)
Weekly reflections on topical issues from a range of contributors.

SUN 08:58 Tweet of the Day (b08sndpm)
David Lindo on the Honey Buzzard

David Lindo the Urban Birder tells the story of one magical early morning in central London, spotting a honey buzzard flying over the face of Big Ben. He urges people in cities to ‘always look up’ as there is an amazing variety of birds to be spotted even in the most concrete of jungles.

Tweet of the Day has captivated the Radio 4 audience with its daily 90 seconds of birdsong. But what of the listener to this avian chorus? In this new series of Tweet of the Day, we bring to the airwaves the conversational voices of those who listen to and are inspired by birds. Building on the previous series, a more informal approach to learning alongside a renewed emphasis on encounter with nature and reflection in our relationship with the natural world.

Producer Maggie Ayre.

SUN 09:00 Broadcasting House (m000xds6)
The Sunday morning news magazine programme. Presented by Paddy O’Connell

SUN 10:00 The Archers Omnibus (m000xds8)
Writers, Sarah McDonald- Hughes & Nick Warburton
Director, Kim Greengrass
Editor, Jeremy Howe

Brian Aldridge … Charles Collingwood
Lee Bryce … Ryan Early
Alice Carter … Hollie Chapman
Neil Carter … Brian Hewlett
Susan Carter … Charlotte Martin
Ian Craig … Stephen Kennedy
Justin Elliott … Simon Williams
Rex Fairbother … Nick Barber
Clarrie Grundy … Heather Bell
Eddie Grundy … Trevor Harrison
Shula Hebden- Lloyd … Judy Bennett
Alistair Lloyd … Michael Lumsden
Adam Macy … Andrew Wincott
Lynda Snell … Carole Boyd

SUN 10:54 Tweet of the Day (m000xdsb)
Tweet Take 5 : Three Doves

The differing fortunes of three dove species found in Britain is the subject of this extended episode of Tweet of the Day. We hear fom actor and keen birdwatcher Samuel West on the now rare turtle dove; presenter Kate Humble on the often overlooked stock dove and Sir David Attenborough on the collared dove whose expansion across the country began in the 1950’s.

Producer : Andrew Dawes for BBC Audio in Bristol

SUN 11:00 Desert Island Discs (m000xdsd)
Margaret Busby, publisher

Margaret Busby, publisher and editor, shares the soundtrack of her life with Lauren Laverne.

SUN 11:45 Marketing: Hacking the Unconscious (b08nq9wm)
Series 1

A Campaign for ‘Real’ Women?

Rory Sutherland looks at advertising’s often harmful portrayal of women, and explores how the aspiration to show “real beauty” can be reconciled with real profit.

In 2004, Unilever unveiled a marketing campaign that went against every received norm of the beauty industry. Instead of images of skinny, retouched, fashion models, the “Dove Campaign For Real Beauty” showcased women of every age, colour, shape and size – acknowledging the artifice, and psychological harm, of generations of fashion and cosmetics ads.

But can a campaign that empowers women’s “real beauty” be trusted: when its ultimate aim is to sell you more stuff? Rory discusses how and why the industry represents women the way it does with writer and comedian Sara Pascoe, with contributions from evolutionary psychologist Geoffrey Miller, and marketing executive Daryl Fielding, who helped mastermind the original Dove campaign.

Producer: Steven Rajam

Why do certain marketing campaigns – from Nike’s “Just Do It” to the MND Ice Bucket Challenge – cast such a spell over us? Rory Sutherland explores the story – and the psychology – behind ten of the most influential campaigns in history – with first-hand accounts from the creative minds that conceived them, and contributions from the worlds of evolutionary biology, behavioural psychology, socio-economics and anthropology.

Marketing. It’s come to be one of the most misunderstood – and maligned – disciplines of our age: perceived variously as the Emperor’s New Clothes, an emblem of the ills of capitalism, a shadowy dark art designed to steal away our hard-earned money and make us do (or buy, or vote for) things we don’t want.

Yet marketing is undeniably a key part of contemporary culture. It’s a science that’s fundamentally about human behaviour – marketers, to some extent, understand us better than we know ourselves – and in the most successful campaigns we find our deepest emotions and urges, from altruism to shame, hope to bravado, systematically tapped into and drawn upon.

But what are these primal behaviours that the best campaigns evoke in us – and how do they harness them? Is marketing purely about commercial gain or can it underpin real common good and societal progress? And does the discipline manipulate our subconscious instincts and emotions – or simply hold a mirror to them?

Over ten episodes, senior advertising creative and Spectator writer Rory Sutherland unravels the story of some of the most powerful, brilliant and influential campaigns of our age. Set alongside personal testimonies from the brilliant minds that created them, we’ll hear from a host of experts – from biologists to philosophers, novelists to economists – about how these campaigns got under our skin and proved to be so influential.

Contributors include: writer and former copywriter Fay Weldon; social behaviourist and expert on altruism Nicola Raihani; Alexander Nix, CEO of big data analysts Cambridge Analytica; philosopher Andy Martin; writer on Islamic issues and advisor to the world’s first Islamic branding consultancy, Shelina Janmohamed; and evolutionary psychologist Geoffrey Miler.

SUN 12:00 News Summary (m000xdty)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4

SUN 12:04 I’m Sorry I Haven’t A Clue (m000x501)
Series 75

Episode 2

The 75th series of Radio 4’s multi award-winning ‘antidote to panel games’ promises yet more homespun wireless entertainment for the young at heart. This series is coming to you from the Radio Theatre in Broadcasting House but with a 1000-strong remote audience drawn exclusively from the Midlands. Regular panellists Tony Hawks and Marcus Brigstocke are once again joined by first-timers Vicki Pepperdine and Henning Wehn, with Jack Dee in the chair. At the piano – Colin Sell.

Producer – Jon Naismith
A BBC Studios production

SUN 12:32 The Food Programme (m000xdsj)
Cyrus Todiwala: A Life Through Food

Cyrus Todiwala’s food story: from Mumbai childhood to becoming a pioneering Indian chef.

Produced and presented by Dan Saladino.

SUN 12:57 Weather (m000xdsl)
The latest weather forecast

SUN 13:00 The World This Weekend (m000xdsn)
Jonny Dymond looks at the week’s big stories from both home and around the world.

SUN 13:30 The Listening Project (m000xdsq)
Capturing the nation in conversation, in partnership with the British Library.

SUN 14:00 Gardeners’ Question Time (m000x7v5)
GQT at Home

Kathy Clugston hosts the horticultural programme featuring a group of gardening experts. Bob Flowerdew, James Wong and Christine Walkden are on hand to answer questions sent in by green-fingered listeners.

Producer – Jemima Rathbone
Assistant Producer – Millie Chu

A Somethin’ Else production for BBC Radio 4

SUN 14:45 Thought Cages (m0001b8z)
The Virtue of Commitment

Why do humans go to such lengths to show their commitment to others? Rory Sutherland continues his exploration of behavioural quirks and mind hacks with a look at how businesses thrive on our susceptibility to be swayed by commitment, from the ‘Knowledge’ exams of a London cabbie to the strange rituals of upper-class British etiquette.

Produced by Michael Surcombe for BBC Wales

SUN 15:00 DH Lawrence: Tainted Love (m000xdss)
The Rainbow

‘DH Lawrence: Tainted Love’ dynamically puts centre stage Lawrence’s daring writing on the complexity of love and desire.
The Rainbow dramatised by Linda Marshall Griffiths.

It is the dawn of female suffrage and Ursula, now a young woman, strives for sexual and financial independence. Ursula refuses to be tied down by the confines of her gender and the expectations of her family as she searches for sexual and intellectual fulfilment beyond the boundaries of her small town.

Ursula ….. Cassie Bradley
Anton ….. Nico Mirallegro
Anna ….. Rosalie Craig
Will ….. Lee Ingleby
Winifred ….. Tala Gouveia
Harby ….. Graeme Hawley
Young Ursula ….. Florence Hunt

Directed by Nadia Molinari
BBC Audio Drama North Production

Part of ‘DH Lawrence Tainted Love’ linking two novels ‘The Rainbow’ and ‘Women in Love’ that dynamically put centre stage Lawrence’s daring writing on the complexity of human love. Sexual awakening, transgression and repression are explored as his characters try to find happiness and fulfilment in uncertain times. Set in a mining town in Nottinghamshire, ‘Tainted Love’ is a celebration of Lawrence at his most bold, pushing the boundaries of sexuality in the dawning of the Twentieth Century.

Upon publication in 1915 ‘The Rainbow’ was suppressed on the grounds of obscenity, all copies were destroyed and it remained banned in Britain for 11 years under the Obscene Publications Act 1857.

With thanks to the Estate of Frieda Lawrence Ravagli.

SUN 16:00 Open Book (m000xdsv)
Damon Galgut

Programme looking at new fiction and non-fiction books, talking to authors and publishers and unearthing lost classics. Producer: Di Speirs

SUN 16:30 Poetry Please (m000xdsx)
Cecilia Knapp

The Young Poet Laureate Cecilia Knapp delves into the listener requests and shares a selection of her favourite poems, including Danez Smith, Rachel Long and Frank O’Hara. And we’ll hear Cecilia read one of her own poems.

Producer: Caitlin Hobbs for BBC Audio in Bristol

SUN 17:00 File on 4 (m000x6bh)
Award-winning current affairs documentary series

SUN 17:40 Profile (m000xdgg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Saturday]

SUN 17:54 Shipping Forecast (m000xdsz)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.

SUN 17:57 Weather (m000xdt1)
The latest weather reports and forecast

SUN 18:00 Six O’Clock News (m000xdt3)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4

SUN 18:15 Pick of the Week (m000xdt5)
Chris Hawkins

Chris Hawkins chooses the best of BBC audio this week.

SUN 19:00 Short Works (b07w6j2v)
Lay Not Thy Hand Upon the Head by Ned Beauman

One of five stories originally commissioned from some of the UK’s rising writers to accompany the 2016 shortlist for the BBC National Short Story Award:

LAY NOT THY HAND UPON THE LAD by Ned Beauman
On the island, at the command of the Algorithm, father and son carry out the culling of the Woolly Anteater. But one day their work is interrupted by a new set of instructions..

Reader Allan Corduner

Producer Duncan Minshull

SUN 19:15 Hennikay (m000xdt7)
Bill Bailey stars in this brand new comedy special about a middle aged man who, after 45 years, and for reasons quite unknown to him, suddenly meets up with his imaginary childhood friend, Hennikay.

It’s the biggest day in his career and he is on the brink of closing the biggest deal in the history of Maidstone but, when Guy Starling strides into his office at Solutify Technology, a software house that develops games for grown-ups to waste their time playing on their phones, he is confronted with an 11 year old boy playing keepy-uppies.

And to make matters worse, no one else can see or hear him. Because he is Hennikay, Guy’s imaginary friend from his lonely childhood.

Neither of them know why he is there after all these years but he refuses to leave and, even though he sees the world through the naïve eyes of a child from 1976, Hennikay might just be there to help his oldest (and only) friend in the world save the day and close the deal.

Acclaimed comedian (and reigning Strictly Come Dancing Champion) Bill Bailey leads a cast which includes Sanjeev Bhaskar and Elizabeth Carling in this warm, funny look at childhood, adulthood and some of the follies of modern life – where a man with a confused child in his head might just be the sanest man in the room.

Cast:
Guy – Bill Bailey
Tony – Sanjeev Bhaskar
Marika – Elizabeth Carling
Kallie – Anna Leong Brophy
Don – John Schwab
Hennikay – Max Pattison

Written by David Spicer
Producer: Liz Anstee

A CPL production for BBC Radio 4

SUN 19:45 The Chronicles of Burke Street (m000xdt9)
3: Tara’s Story

The next in the brilliant new short story series by the award-winning author of ‘Love After Love’, Ingrid Persaud.

Set on an everyday street in Port of Spain, Trinidad, ‘The Chronicles of Burke Street’ follows the lives and loves of its unusual residents. Burke Street might seem like an ordinary street, but behind its closed doors lurk secrets, superstitions and barely concealed lies.

Today, in ‘Tara’s Story’, read by Jade Anouka, a young teacher wrestles with her dating apps in her search for Miss Right….

Writer: Ingrid Persaud is the winner of the 2018 BBC National Short Story Award, and her novel Love After Love won the 2020 Costa First Novel Award.
Reader: Jade Anouka
Producer: Justine Willett

SUN 20:00 More or Less (m000x4vn)
Tim Harford explains the numbers and statistics used in everyday life

SUN 20:30 Last Word (m000x7v9)
Matthew Bannister tells the life stories of people who have recently died, from the rich and famous to unsung but significant. Prod: Eleanor Garland (Beverley Purcell Apr-July)

SUN 21:00 Money Box (m000xdfr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 on Saturday]

SUN 21:25 Radio 4 Appeal (m000xdry)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 today]

SUN 21:30 Analysis (m000x507)
A New Unionism?

Unionism in Northern Ireland is facing a highly uncertain future. Its divided party politics make the headlines. But beyond that, post-Brexit border rules and talk of a possible vote on Irish reunification is causing much anxiety. Even more profoundly, changes in the province’s population and attitudes among different generations are weakening traditional loyalties. Pessimists fear all this could be seriously destabilising. Others argue that a new kind of unionism, focused on the practical benefits of links to Britain, can revive the cause. Chris Bowlby listens in to a debate with major implications for the UK as a whole.

Producer: Jim Frank
Editor: Jasper Corbett

SUN 22:00 Westminster Hour (m000xdtc)
Radio 4’s Sunday night political discussion programme.

SUN 23:00 The Film Programme (m000x6w1)
Film programme looking at the latest cinema releases, DVDs and films on TV.

SUN 23:30 Something Understood (b04n2fmh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 06:05 today]

MONDAY 28 JUNE 2021

MON 00:00 Midnight News (m000xdtf)
The latest news and weather forecast from BBC Radio 4.

MON 00:15 Sideways (m000x4wh)
Bonfire night, November 5th 2015, 9.30pm. An agent fires off an email. An author is accused of plagiarism. His new book lies ready to be pulped.

In the first of a new series of Sideways, Matthew Syed asks why we’re doomed to be unoriginal and why it hurts so much to be, well, not that special.

In 1998, Hollywood directors Matthew Bay and Mimi Leder went head to head with suspiciously similar disaster movies – Armageddon and Deep Impact. Allegations of late-night spying flew around. But could there have just been something in the air? Matthew reveals that, four years earlier, fragments of the Shoemaker-Levy 9 Comet smashed into Jupiter and right into the American consciousness.

This is the thing… As Matthew discovers, our brains are wired for unoriginality, we evolve as a collective brain, absorbing our shared cultural cues and looking for what has worked in the past. But if that’s the norm, why do we feel so disappointed when our ideas seem unoriginal, when someone else beats us to it? And is there a way out of this – to rekindle our originality?

Presenter: Matthew Syed
Producer/Series Editor: Katherine Godfrey
Executive Producer: Max O’Brien
Music, Sound Design and Mix: Nicholas Alexander
Research and Development: Gavin Haynes and Madeleine Parr
Theme Music: Seventy Times Seven by Ioana Selaru
A Novel production for BBC Radio 4

MON 00:45 Bells on Sunday (m000xdgz)
[Repeat of broadcast at 05:43 on Sunday]

MON 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m000xdth)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.

MON 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m000xdtk)
BBC Radio 4 presents a selection of news and current affairs, arts and science programmes from the BBC World Service.

MON 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m000xdtm)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.

MON 05:30 News Briefing (m000xdtp)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4

MON 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m000xdtr)
Radio 4’s daily prayer and reflection. Producer: Mo McCullough/Ailsa McIntosh

MON 05:45 Farming Today (m000xdtt)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.

MON 05:56 Weather (m000xdtw)
The latest weather forecast for farmers.

MON 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b03bkt5h)
Shore Lark

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about the British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Wildlife Sound Recordist, Chris Watson, presents the Shore Lark. Shore Larks are also known as horned larks because in the breeding season the male birds sprout a pair of black crown feathers which look like satanic horns, but at any time of year the adult larks are striking birds. They are slightly smaller than a skylark but with a yellow face, a black moustache and a black band on the chest.

MON 06:00 Today (m000xdx2)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.

MON 09:00 Start the Week (m000xdx4)
Ali Smith

Ali Smith talks to Andrew Marr about Summer, the finale to her ambitious, ground-breaking Seasonal quartet of novels. Since 2016, the prize-winning writer has been working on a cycle of novels that not only explore the changing seasons, but reflect the times we are living in. With the tightest turnaround from manuscript to book, Smith’s ambition was to create real contemporaneous ‘state of the nation’ works. She reflects on a country voting on its future, people and families on the brink of change, and now living through a pandemic, while also understanding how art, nature and landscape speak of a deeper truth.

Producer: Katy Hickman
Photograph by Sarah Wood

MON 09:45 Unfollow by Megan Phelps-Rope (m000xdyr)
Episode 1: Obey

Megan Phelps-Roper reads from her brutally frank memoir about growing up in the fire-and-brimstone Westboro Baptist Church, in Kansas – often called ‘the most hated family in America’ – a religious sect aggressive in its homophobia and antisemitism, and notorious for picketing the funerals of American soldiers.

From the age of five Megan was protesting daily, believing that she was doing God’s work. But, aged 26, she came to a realisation: Westboro’s teachings were a monstrous lie and she must leave, turn her back on her family, her church — her entire world – and start over.

Today: Megan recalls her early protests, and growing up under Westboro’s doctrine of absolute obedience.

Abridged by Sara Davies
Produced by Elizabeth Allard

MON 10:00 Woman’s Hour (m000xdx8)
Women’s voices and women’s lives – topical conversations to inform, challenge and inspire.

MON 11:00 Elon Musk: The Evening Rocket (m000xdxb)
Dimension X

Jill Lepore untangles the strange sci-fi roots of Silicon Valley’s extreme capitalism – with its extravagant, existential and extra-terrestrial plans to save humanity. In this world, stock prices can be driven partly by fantasies found in blockbuster superhero movies, but that come from science fiction, some of it a century old. If anyone personifies this phenomenon, it’s Elon Musk, the richest or second-richest person in the world on any given day. “The bare facts of Musk’s life, the way they’re usually told, make him sound like a fictional character, a comic-book superhero,” says Lepore. He says he hopes to colonize Mars, create brain-hacking implants and avert an AI apocalypse. He even has a baby named X. In this first episode Lepore looks at the early origins of ‘Muskism’, and explores how the science fiction stories that today’s techno-billionaires grew up on have shaped Silicon Valley’s vision of the future.

Jill Lepore is Professor of American History at Harvard University, a staff writer at The New Yorker and an acclaimed author. Her latest book is If Then: How the Simulmatics Corporation Invented the Future. She is also the host of The Last Archive, a podcast from Pushkin Industries.
Producer: Viv Jones
Researcher: Oliver Riskin-Kutz
Editor: Hugh Levinson
Sound: Graham Puddifoot
Original music by Corntuth

MON 11:30 Loose Ends (m000xdgd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 18:15 on Saturday]

MON 12:00 News Summary (m000xdz6)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4

MON 12:04 Zennor in Darkness by Helen Dunmore (m000xdxj)
Episode 6

Helen Dunmore’s prize-winning first novel is set in the late spring, early summer of 1917. War haunts the Cornish coast and ships are being sunk by U-boats, strangers are treated with suspicion, and newspapers are full of spy stories.

Into this uneasy landscape, to a hamlet just outside St Ives, come DH Lawrence and his German wife, Frieda. They are hoping to escape the war-fever that grips London and also to live as cheaply as possible in a rented cottage. The pacifist Lawrence is reeling from his latest novel, The Rainbow, having been banned for obscenity, and is struggling to finish and publish its sequel, Women in Love.

They befriend Clare Coyne, a young artist who has lived alone with her father since her mother died when she was a child.

Written by Helen Dunmore
Read by Louise Brealey
Abridged by Jill Waters and Isobel Creed
Produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4

MON 12:18 You and Yours (m000xdxl)
News and discussion of consumer affairs

MON 12:57 Weather (m000xdxn)
The latest weather forecast

MON 13:00 World at One (m000xdxq)
Forty-five minutes of news, analysis and comment, with Sarah Montague.

MON 13:45 The Kindness Experiment (m000xdxs)
It All Starts in Ali’s Corner Shop

A series of people in Bristol embark on a journey of doing something kind for someone else. Along the way they reflect on what it is to be kind and to receive kindness. What stops us from being kind sometimes and how does it feel to do something nice for a stranger, expecting nothing in return?
In the first episode we meet a random group of people in the local shop in St Werburghs in Bristol run by Ali. Everyone in the neighbourhood knows him and talks about how kind he is to all of his customers. Setting up shop in his store Ella Scotland Waters meets some of those customers and engages them in conversations that ask them to reflect on kindness and what it means to them. Some of them will take up the challenge across the week to do something kind for someone they don’t know and don’t necessarily even like and to see what effect that has both on the recipient but also on themselves and their wellbeing.

With the participation and advice of Professor Bruce Hood from the School of Psychological Science, University of Bristol. His Happiness courses have helped his students during lockdown. Can he help us all to be kinder?

Presenter: Ella Scotland Waters

Producer for BBC Audio Bristol: Maggie Ayre

MON 14:00 Takeover (m000xdxv)
Episode 1

Self-made business mogul Ravi Majumdar risks losing the business empire he has spent a lifetime building, to defeat his enemy and competitor.

Concerned for their inheritance, his four children – Ash the eldest who considers himself the natural heir, Zara the aspiring Bollywood actress, Shaan the least confident who yearns for his father’s attention, and Maya the brilliant student – fight for control of the company and attempt to defeat competition for their father’s affections and fortune.

A fast-paced, globe-trotting family saga of power, revenge and karma with helicopters, private jets and a tiger reserve. Starring Rajit Kapur.

Recorded both in the UK and India.

Cast:
Ravi Majumdar……Rajit Kapur
Anya……Dolya Gavasnki
Ash……Abhin Galeya
Maya……Amrita Acharia
Zara……Munirih Grace
Shaan……Danny Ashok
Ian……Finbar Lynch
Seraphina……Jennifer Armour
Dr Lincoln……Emma Carter
Jeet……Ronny Jhutti

All other parts were played by:
Neil D’Souza
Ash Hunter
Philip Desmeules
Natalie Simpson
Lola Ogunyemi
Matthew Solon and
Nadir Khan

With original music by Sacha Puttnam

Written by Ayeesha Menon and Matthew Solon
Sound Design by Eloise Whitmore
Sound recording by Paul Clark, Ashyar Bulsara and Ayush Ahuja
Assistant Producer, Eleanor Mein
Production Assistant, Anna Calandra
Produced by Emma Hearn and Nadir Khan
Director and Executive Producer, John Scott Dryden

A Goldhawk production for BBC Radio 4

MON 14:45 The Why Factor (b06810pv)
Why do so many men wear a tie?

It’s mundane. About 150 centimetres long, often made of satin or silk and worn by millions, mostly by men, every day. Mike Williams explores the enduring appeal of the tie.

It’s a paradoxical item of clothing: One the one hand, it expresses a desire to fit in and conform – to belong – yet it also says something about our need to demonstrate our individuality. Historically, wearing a tie has meant many different things: from being seen as being anti-Islamic in the wake of the Iranian Revolution in 1979, to representing subversion and being a symbol of sub-cultural cool.

Producer: Jim Frank

MON 15:00 The 3rd Degree (m000xdxx)
Series 11

The University of Northampton

A funny, lively and dynamic quiz presented by Steve Punt and recorded on location at a different university each week, pitting three undergraduates against three of their professors. This week the show comes from the University of Northampton.

The rounds vary between specialist subjects and general knowledge, quickfire bell-and-buzzer rounds and the Highbrow and Lowbrow round cunningly devised to test not only the students’ knowledge of current affairs, history, languages and science, but also their Professors’ awareness of television, sport, and quite possibly Ed Sheeran. And the Head-to-Head rounds, in which students take on their Professors in their own subjects, offer plenty of scope for mild embarrassment on both sides.

The specialist subjects this week are International Development, Law and Organized Crime, and Nursing – and the questions range from piercings and postage to erythema and smokeballs.

The other universities in this series are Southampton, Nottingham Trent, Anglia Ruskin, Brasenose College Oxford and Cumbria.

Producer: David Tyler
A Pozzitive production for BBC Radio 4

MON 15:30 The Food Programme (m000xdsj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:32 on Sunday]

MON 16:00 Written in Scotland (m000x6v5)
Episode 1: Nationalism and Unionism

A four-part series about the relationship that Scotland’s writers have with Scotland itself. Presented by Kirsty Wark. Episode 1 – Nationalism and Unionism.

How did the writers of Scotland respond to the Union with England? Kirsty looks at the way in which Scottish poets and novelists have uniquely and sometimes controversially reflected the political turmoil around them. She hears about James MacPherson, the poet who produced supposed translations of Ossian, claimed as an ancient Gaelic bard, which became a European sensation. Yet at the same time as the poems appeared, the Highland clan life the poems reflected was being destroyed as the Jacobite uprising of 1745 was put down, and James MacPherson himself ended his life as a wealthy Member of Parliament.

We also hear about Robert Burns, a proud Scottish nationalist, who castigated the ‘powers that be of Scotland for being bought and sold for English gold’ but who was also a government employee for the excise.

And on the other side of the coin, Sir Walter Scott was a proud supporter of the union with England who probably did more than anyone else to preserve Scotland’s distinctiveness in writing.

Producer: Brian McCluskey
A Whistledown Scotland production for BBC Radio 4

MON 16:30 The Digital Human (m000xdy0)
Series 20

Vilify

Aleks Krotoski explores what it’s like be ‘villain of the day’ on social media

It seems every day an individual rightly or wrongly becomes the object of the online world’s condemnation. What’s that like and what motivates people to pile on? Are the criticisms always made in good faith or is there something more complex going on with what the critics are trying to signal.

Producer: Peter McManus

MON 17:00 PM (m000xdy2)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day’s headlines.

MON 18:00 Six O’Clock News (m000xdy6)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

MON 18:30 I’m Sorry I Haven’t A Clue (m000xdy8)
Series 75

Episode 3

This edition in the 75th series of the nation’s favourite wireless entertainment comes to you from the Radio Theatre in Broadcasting House but with a 1000-strong remote audience drawn exclusively from Wales. Welshman Rob Brydon leads an all-star panel comprising Miles Jupp, Pippa Evans, Rory Bremner and the show’s reluctant host, Jack Dee. At the piano – Colin Sell

Producer Jon Naismith
A BBC Studios production

MON 19:00 The Archers (m000xdyb)
Lily regrets her actions and Vince makes his presence felt.

MON 19:15 Front Row (m000xdyd)
Live magazine programme on the worlds of arts, literature, film, media and music

MON 19:45 Two Minutes Past Nine (m000msvk)
Episode 1: April 19th

On April 19th 1995 a 26-year-old named Timothy Mcveigh steered a yellow rental truck into downtown Oklahoma city. Inside was a two-ton homemade explosive.

Oklahoma City Bombing is the deadliest act of domestic terrorism in US history, killing 168 people and leaving 680 injured. Journalist Leah Sottile investigates the legacy of the attack.

Recorded over some of the most divisive and turbulent months in recent American political history, Two Minutes Past Nine explores and questions the changing face of far right extremism in all its chaos and conspiracism.

Presenter: Leah Sottile
Producer: Georgia Catt
Editor: Philip Sellars

Narration recorded by Joe Preston
Additional Research by Robbie Wojciechowski

MON 20:00 The New Deal – A Story For Our Times (m000nd0b)
2: Thunder From the Left

Marybeth Hamilton explores the New Deal’s most progressive & controversial period. Was a new alliance between workers and government really emerging for the first time in American history? Might they be fashioning a world together that, if not entirely free from fear & want, was becoming a more just & equitable America? By 1935 millions were working for the government on the W.P.A. . Building the nation’s infrastructure. Anything from airports to dog pounds whilst artists & writers documented the voiceless & the land itself. For the first time in history labor’s voice was being heeded in Washington. Could this ‘fragile’ juggernaut stay on course?

With the voices of: Tony Badger, Ken Byndas, Zach Carter, Kristin Downey, Steve Fraser, Gary Gerstle, Tom Girdler Jr, Kiran Klaus Patel, Ahmed White.
Reader: Roger Ringrose

Producer: Mark Burman

MON 20:30 Analysis (m000xdyg)
A Hundred Glorious Years?

The first, modest Congress of the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) took place in late July 1921. Of the twelve original members, only Mao Zedong and one of his closest aides survived to take part in the founding of the People’s Republic in 1949. The others were killed by political opponents, lost factional struggles or took up other creeds. And the CCP’s history has been punctuated by in-fighting, purges, jailings, defections and sudden deaths.

The Party itself sees things differently. Only it was able to push China into the future, the CCP claims, after earlier abortive attempts to modernise the country – and to secure the global eminence that it now enjoys. Its narrative also insists on the CCP’s seamless triumph over obstacles placed in its path by malevolent foreign powers and reactionary domestic forces.

A hundred years on from the CCP’s foundation, the eminent China-watcher Isabel Hilton assesses the importance of the Party’s centenary and asks why control of its view of its history is so important. She shows which events and ideological shifts the CCP prefers not to highlight or to ignore altogether. She considers why so much of the Party’s history swings between periods of repression and liberalisation. And she explores how Xi Jinping, its current leader, is using the centenary. What will preoccupy the CCP in the years ahead?

Producer Simon Coates
Editor Jasper Corbett

MON 21:00 Detoxifying the Classics (m000x72t)
Why are white nationalists and the far right so fond of Ancient Greece and Rome? Katherine Harloe, Professor of Classics and Intellectual History at the University of Reading, looks at the ways in which the classical world is both used to lend respectability to the politics of hate, and distorted to give the false impression that it was an all-white space.

But this is not just a modern problem – from British colonial India to fascist Italy, Katherine delves into the last 300 years of history to explain how the ancient world and white supremacy became entwined, and asks what classicists today can do about it.

Produced by Nathan Gower
An Overcoat Media production for BBC Radio 4

MON 21:30 Start the Week (m000xdx4)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]

MON 22:00 The World Tonight (m000xdyk)
In depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective

MON 22:45 Zennor in Darkness by Helen Dunmore (m000xdxj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 today]

MON 23:00 Rewinder (m000xdfh)
[Repeat of broadcast at 10:30 on Saturday]

MON 23:30 Today in Parliament (m000xdym)
News, views and features on today’s stories in Parliament

TUESDAY 29 JUNE 2021

TUE 00:00 Midnight News (m000xdyp)
The latest news and weather forecast from BBC Radio 4.

TUE 00:30 Unfollow by Megan Phelps-Rope (m000xdyr)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Monday]

TUE 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m000xdyt)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.

TUE 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m000xdyw)
BBC Radio 4 presents a selection of news and current affairs, arts and science programmes from the BBC World Service.

TUE 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m000xdyy)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.

TUE 05:30 News Briefing (m000xdz0)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4

TUE 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m000xdz2)
Radio 4’s daily prayer and reflection. Producer: Mo McCullough/Ailsa McIntosh

TUE 05:45 Farming Today (m000xdz4)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.

TUE 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b04t0syn)
Poorwill (American Nightjar)

Michael Palin presents the common poorwill from an Arizona desert. In the dead of night, loud calls pierce the stillness on a moonlit track, a small shape suddenly sprouts wings and flutters into the darkness … a Common Poorwill is hunting.

Poorwills are small nightjars that breed mainly in western North America, often in deserts and dry grassland. By day the poorwill sits in the open or among rocks relying on its mottled plumage for camouflage. By night, it emerges to hawk after insects snapping them up with its large frog-like mouth.
This technique works if it’s warm enough for insects to be active, but in some places where poorwills live there are sudden cold snaps. Instead of migrating, the poorwill slows down its metabolism and goes into torpor for days or even weeks . This hibernation-like state is very rare among birds and allows the poorwill to get through lean periods and was first scientifically described in 1948, although the phenomenon had been recorded more than 140 years earlier by the great explorer Meriwether Lewis, during the Lewis and Clark Expedition to discover western side of America in 1804.

TUE 06:00 Today (m000xd1p)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.

TUE 09:00 The Long View (m000xd1t)
Air Hijacking

After a plane carrying a Belarussian dissident was recently hijacked Jonathan Freedland examines a similar incident 50 years ago when a British plane was forced to land in Libya.

Victor Mallet was an 11 year old boy flying to the Sudanese capital Khartoum to join his parents when the BOAC plane he was travelling on was forcibly landed by Libyan authorities in July 1971. Sudanese dissidents involved in a recently successful coup were ordered off the plane by Colonel Gaddafi’s forces and were later executed. An international furore was triggered by this violation of international air regulations putting a passenger plane in danger. The story bears a remarkable resemblance to that of the Ryan Air plane forced to land in Belarus and where the dissident journalist Roman Protasevich was seized by the authorities.

Victor joins Jonathan to explore the Long View of air hijacking.

Producer Neil McCarthy

TUE 09:30 A Show of Hands (m000xd1w)
Episode 4

More perspectives on human hands and the way we use them.

TUE 09:45 Unfollow by Megan Phelps-Rope (m000xd2s)
Episode 2: Something Is Wrong

Megan Phelps-Roper reads from her brutally frank memoir about growing up in the fire-and-brimstone Westboro Baptist Church – often called ‘the most hated family in America’ – and how she came to question its doctrine of hate.

Megan Phelps-Roper was raised in Topeka, Kansas in the Westboro Baptist Church – the religious sect aggressive in its homophobia and antisemitism, and notorious for picketing the funerals of American soldiers. From the age of five Megan was protesting daily, believing that she was doing God’s work. But, aged 26, she came to a realisation: Westboro’s teachings were a lie and she must leave, turn her back on her family, her church — her entire world – and start over.

In this episode, Megan is now a teenager and Westboro’s protesting activities are gathering momentum. For the first time Megan senses that something is very wrong.

Abridged by Sara Davies
Produced by Elizabeth Allard

TUE 10:00 Woman’s Hour (m000xd20)
Women’s voices and women’s lives – topical conversations to inform, challenge and inspire.

TUE 11:00 Lost for Words (m000xf0l)
Struggling to find words might be one of the first things we notice when someone develops dementia, while more advanced speech loss can make it really challenging to communicate with loved ones. And understanding what’s behind these changes may help us overcome communication barriers when caring for someone living with the condition.

When Ebrahim developed Alzheimer’s Disease, for example, he’d been living in the UK for many years. Gradually his fluent English faded and he reverted to his mother tongue, Farsi – which made things tricky for his English-speaking family who were caring for him. Two decades on, his son, the journalist and author David Shariatmadari, seeks answers to his father’s experience of language loss. What can neuroscience reveal about dementia, ageing, and language changes? Why are some aspects of language more vulnerable than others – and, importantly, what are the best approaches to communicating with someone living with dementia?

David reflects on archive recordings of his dad, and speaks to a family in a similar situation to theirs, to compare the ways they tried to keep communication alive. And he discovers there are actually clear benefits to bilingualism when it comes to dementia: juggling two or more languages can delay the onset of symptoms by around four years. So while losing one of his languages posed practical difficulties for Ebrahim, it’s possible that by speaking two languages in the first place, he was able to spend more valuable lucid years with his family.

Presented by David Shariatmadari and produced by Cathy Edwards

TUE 11:30 Guide Books (m000xf0n)
On Nature with Helen Macdonald and Melissa Harrison

A new series about how books might help us navigate everyday life, presented by writer and broadcaster Damian Barr.

Each episode takes a life experience – such as grief – and talks to writers about they handle it through their own reading, writing and lived experience. We explore the fiction, non-fiction, memoir and poetry that might help us better understand our own stories.

This week – how can we deepen our engagement with the natural world around us? Many of us experienced a shift in our relationship with nature during the pandemic; how can we stay tuned in to nature, and keep looking with fresh eyes, as the world grows busier once more? Damian is joined by Helen Macdonald (Vesper Flights; H is for Hawk) and Melissa Harrison (The Stubborn Light of Things; By Ash, Oak and Thorn; All Among the Barley) to talk about the poetry, field guides and fiction that have guided them.

Produced by Mair Bosworth

TUE 12:00 News Summary (m000xf0q)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4

TUE 12:04 Zennor in Darkness by Helen Dunmore (m000xd2j)
Episode 7

Helen Dunmore’s prize-winning first novel is set in the late spring, early summer of 1917. War haunts the Cornish coast and ships are being sunk by U-boats, strangers are treated with suspicion, and newspapers are full of spy stories.

Into this uneasy landscape, to a hamlet just outside St Ives, come DH Lawrence and his German wife, Frieda. They are hoping to escape the war-fever that grips London and also to live as cheaply as possible in a rented cottage. The pacifist Lawrence is reeling from his latest novel, The Rainbow, having been banned for obscenity, and is struggling to finish and publish its sequel, Women in Love.

They befriend Clare Coyne, a young artist who has lived alone with her father since her mother died when she was a child.

Written by Helen Dunmore
Read by Louise Brealey
Abridged by Jill Waters and Isobel Creed
Produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4

TUE 12:18 You and Yours (m000xf0s)
News and discussion of consumer affairs

TUE 12:57 Weather (m000xf0v)
The latest weather forecast

TUE 13:00 World at One (m000xf0x)
Forty-five minutes of news, analysis and comment, with Sarah Montague.

TUE 13:45 The Kindness Experiment (m000xf0z)
James and Granny Eves

In this episode James who works in construction admits he was unkind to a woman who was shouting at him in the street. He regrets shouting back at her but says that people get what they give. But then his conversation with Ella in the corner shop in St Werburghs is interrupted by the same woman who barges past angry and distressed. What happens when Ella and James intervene to try and make amends?

Presenter: Ella Scotland Waters
Producer: Maggie Ayre

With Professor Bruce Hood of the School of Psychological Science at the University of Bristol

TUE 14:00 The Archers (m000xdyb)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Monday]

TUE 14:15 Takeover (m000xf11)
Episode 2

Self-made business mogul Ravi Majumdar risks losing the business empire he has spent a lifetime building, to defeat his enemy and competitor.

Concerned for their inheritance, his four children – Ash the eldest who considers himself the natural heir, Zara the aspiring Bollywood actress, Shaan the least confident who yearns for his father’s attention, and Maya the brilliant student – fight for control of the company and attempt to defeat competition for their father’s affections and fortune.

A fast-paced, globe-trotting family saga of power, revenge and karma with helicopters, private jets and a tiger reserve. Starring Rajit Kapur.

Recorded both in the UK and India.

Cast:
Ravi Majumdar…… Rajit Kapur
Ash……Abhin Galeya
Maya……Amrita Acharia
Zara……Munirih Grace
Shaan……Danny Ashok
Amit……Tavish Bhattacharyya
Ian……Finbar Lynch
Seraphina……Jennifer Armour
Jai……Vincent Ebrahim
Karan……Zafar Karachiwala
Jeet……Ronny Jhutti
Sharma……Neil D’Souza

All other parts were played by:
Ash Hunter,
Philip Desmeules,
Natalie Simpson,
Lola Ogunyemi,
Aseem Hattangady,
Ayeesha Menon,
Emma Carter
Nadir Khan

With original music by Sacha Puttnam

Written by Ayeesha Menon and Matthew Solon
Sound Design by Eloise Whitmore
Sound recording by Paul Clark, Ashyar Bulsara and Ayush Ahuja
Assistant Producer, Eleanor Mein
Production Assistant, Anna Calandra
Produced by Emma Hearn and Nadir Khan
Director and Executive Producer, John Scott Dryden

A Goldhawk production for BBC Radio 4

TUE 15:00 Short Cuts (m0001hwm)
Series 17

Seasons

Josie Long presents new short documentaries and audio adventures tied to the changing of the seasons.

Laura Barton offers an ode to the sticky heat of summer, we hear the beat of hummingbird wings in autumn and a love story tied to cold British winters and Colombia’s ‘spring city’.

On Music Overheard
Produced by Phil Smith

Heat
Featuring Laura Barton

Tiny Jalopy
Produced by Michelle Macklem

Olga
Produced by Phil Smith

Series Producer: Eleanor McDowall,

A Falling Tree Production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in December 2018.

TUE 15:30 Made of Stronger Stuff (p0957q54)
The Eyes

Psychologist Kimberley Wilson and Dr Xand van Tulleken take a journey around the human body, to find out what it can tell us about our innate capacity for change.

In episode one, Kimberley and Xand take a closer look at the peepers, the mince pies… the eyes! They discover why we don’t always see reality, experience the power of sensory illusions, and hear the amazing story of Jason Esterhuizen, whose sight has been partially restored with the help of a brain implant.

Producer: Dan Hardoon
Executive Producer: Kate Holland

A Whistledown Production for BBC Radio 4

TUE 16:00 Cultural Exchange: Bristol (m000sqss)
Radio 4 documentary.

TUE 16:30 A Good Read (m000xf13)
Yanis Varoufakis and Patrick McGrath

The Greek politician Yanis Varoufakis chooses Margaret Atwood’s treatise on debt – Payback: Debt & The Shadow Side of Wealth as his go to book for students of economics. It examines money lending throughout the ages and how it has been portrayed in classic literature.
Patrick McGrath’s choice is a novel by Nigel Balchain set during the London Blitz: Darkness Falls From The Air which he loves for its humour and for its stoic main character Bill Sarratt, a civil servant whose attempts to get anything done are thwarted by bureaucracy. Yanis describes Bill as a ‘Sir Humphrey’ from Yes Minister character and was unexpectedly delighted to discover the novel.
Harriett’s choice is by Kiley Reid: a smart look at race politics in the USA through the story of a young black nanny and her white employer, white boyfriend and black friends. Such A Fun Age was longlisted for the Booker Prize in 2020.

Producer: Maggie Ayre

TUE 17:00 PM (m000xf15)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day’s headlines.

TUE 18:00 Six O’Clock News (m000xf17)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

TUE 18:30 Ed Reardon’s Week (m000xf19)
Series 14

Battleaxe

Episode 4: Battleaxe

Ed is introduced to Ping’s granny, Lady Ruddington, who has recently made her maiden speech in the House of Lords highlighting the plight of the mole. Ping is convinced that her granny has great British Battleaxe potential so enlists Ed’s skills to produce Lady R’s memoirs. Thus, Ed is handed a plastic carrier bag containing granny’s thoughts and observations, and all he needs to do is “pull it all together”.

Cast list ep 4
Ed Reardon………..Christopher Douglas
Ping…………….……..Barunka O’Shaughnessy
Maggie……………….Pippa Haywood
Granny……………….Maggie Steed
Olive…………………..Stephanie Cole
Pearl…………………..Brigit Forsyth
Stan……………………Geoffrey Whitehead
Newsreader/TV host….Nicola Sanderson

Written by Andrew Nickolds and Christopher Douglas
Produced by Dawn Ellis
Production Co-ordinator: Cherlynn Andrew-Wilfred
Sound Recordist and Editor: David Thomas
A BBC Studios Production

TUE 19:00 The Archers (m000xd24)
Writer, Naylah Ahmed
Director, Julie Beckett
Editor, Jeremy Howe

Elizabeth Pargetter … Alison Dowling
Freddie Pargetter … Toby Laurence
Lily Pargetter … Katie Redford
Russ Jones … Andonis James Anthony
Rex Fairbrother … Nick Barber
Vince Casey … Tony Turner
Mrs Casey … Susan Jameson
Paul … Nick Barber
Sol … Luke Nunn

TUE 19:15 Front Row (m000xd26)
Live magazine programme on the worlds of arts, literature, film, media and music

TUE 19:45 Two Minutes Past Nine (m000mt16)
Episode 2: The First April 19th

25 years on from the largest domestic terror incident in American history, journalist Leah Sottile works to understand what made Timothy McVeigh the home-grown terrorist he was – and how that informs what’s unfolding today.

In episode 2, April 19th 1775 was the day the American Revolution began. And, in some ways, the story of the Oklahoma City Bombing started that day too, 220 years before Timothy Mcveigh steered the yellow Ryder truck into Oklahoma City.

Recorded over some of the most divisive, turbulent, and quite frankly dangerous feeling months in recent American political history, Two Minutes Past Nine aims to understand the changing face of far right extremism in all its chaos and conspiracism.

Presenter: Leah Sottile
Producer: Georgia Catt
Editor: Philip Sellars

Narration recorded by Joe Preston
Additional Research by Robbie Wojciechowski

TUE 20:00 File on 4 (m000xd28)
A Death Sentence?

A death sentence? The inmates dying after poor prison healthcare.
More prisoners are dying in jail – even after you account for the growing – and ageing -prison population. Many of those found to be so-called ‘natural cause deaths’ are relatively young: more than a third are aged between 35 and 54.
Those who’ve been behind bars a short time are at greatest risk…with health records often not consulted and vital medication delayed, sometimes for months.
File on 4 investigates cases where failings in the prison healthcare system contributed to the deaths of inmates – all aged under 50. Their deaths followed basic, shocking, errors: unopened medical records, hospital appointments missed, prisoners not given vital medication – or given the wrong medication that made their condition worse. Prisoners who became gravely ill accused of ‘faking it’.
The programme hears from the family of prisoners, a prison health worker who’s concerned about a lack of resources and the impact of measures to contain Covid. And from experts who say recommendations made time and time again following avoidable deaths simply aren’t being implemented – putting more prisoners at risk in the future.

Reporter: Jane Deith
Producer: Ben Robinson
Editor: Nicola Addyman

TUE 20:40 In Touch (m000xd2b)
News, views and information for people who are blind or partially sighted

TUE 21:00 All in the Mind (m000xd2d)
Programme exploring the limits and potential of the human mind. Producer: Deborah Cohen.

TUE 21:30 The Long View (m000xd1t)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]

TUE 22:00 The World Tonight (m000xd2g)
In depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective

TUE 22:45 Zennor in Darkness by Helen Dunmore (m000xd2j)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 today]

TUE 23:00 Fortunately… with Fi and Jane (m000xd2l)
Fi and Jane speak to BBC Newsreader Reeta Chakrabati.

TUE 23:30 Today in Parliament (m000xd2n)
News, views and features on today’s stories in Parliament

WEDNESDAY 30 JUNE 2021

WED 00:00 Midnight News (m000xd2q)
The latest news and weather forecast from BBC Radio 4.

WED 00:30 Unfollow by Megan Phelps-Rope (m000xd2s)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Tuesday]

WED 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m000xd2w)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.

WED 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m000xd2y)
BBC Radio 4 presents a selection of news and current affairs, arts and science programmes from the BBC World Service.

WED 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m000xd30)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.

WED 05:30 News Briefing (m000xd32)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4

WED 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m000xd34)
Radio 4’s daily prayer and reflection. Producer: Mo McCullough/Ailsa McIntosh

WED 05:45 Farming Today (m000xd36)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.

WED 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b04hkypv)
Echo Parakeet

Tweet of the Day is the voice of birds and our relationship with them, from around the world.

Miranda Krestovnikoff presents the echo parakeet found only in Mauritius, a bird which has brushed extinction by its wingtips. This once familiar bird of the island of Mauritius will only nest in large trees with suitable holes, few of which remain after widespread deforestation on the island. A close relative of the more adaptable ring necked parakeet found now across southern Britain where it’s been introduced, by the 1980’s the wild population of echo parakeets numbered around ten birds. Threatened with extinction in the wild, captive breeding and successful releases into the wild have stabilised the population to about three hundred birds.

WED 06:00 Today (m000xdpg)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.

WED 09:00 More or Less (m000xdpj)
Tim Harford explains the numbers and statistics used in everyday life

WED 09:30 Four Thought (m000xdpl)
Mums in Prison

Dr Shona Minson argues that we shouldn’t punish children if their parents go to prison.

Years ago, as a barrister specialising in care cases, Shona was familiar with the Children Act, and in particular its central principle: that the child’s best interests are the paramount consideration of the court. And so when she was asked to write about what happened to children when their mums were imprisoned, she assumed something similar would apply, or at least that she could find some research about what happened to them. She was shocked to find almost nothing, and even more shocked when she started doing the research herself.

In this talk she describes some the change she believes is needed – from major institutions thinking properly about the problem, to the judgement children face from their schoolmates’ parents, and how she works with judges and other criminal justice professionals to achieve it.

Shona is introduced by host Olly Mann.

Producer: Giles Edwards

WED 09:45 Unfollow by Megan Phelps-Rope (m000xdpn)
Episode 3: Ungodly Affection

Megan Phelps-Roper reads from her brutally frank memoir about growing up in the Westboro Baptist Church – often called ‘the most hated family in America’ – the religious sect aggressive in its homophobia and antisemitism, and notorious for picketing the funerals of American soldiers.

From the age of five Megan was protesting daily, believing that she was doing God’s work. Aged 26, however, she came to a realisation: Westboro’s teachings were a monstrous lie and she must leave, turn her back on her family, her church — her entire world – and start over.

Today: through social media, Megan gets a glimpse of life beyond Westboro’s fire-and-brimstone confines…

Abridged by Sara Davies
Produced by Elizabeth Allard

WED 10:00 Woman’s Hour (m000xdpq)
Women’s voices and women’s lives – topical conversations to inform, challenge and inspire.

WED 11:00 Mitchell on Meetings (m000tdy8)
Double Zoom

Technology makes it easier to hold a meeting than ever before. No-one needs to leave home. David Mitchell thinks it’s all spinning out of control and wants to know what we can do about it. He visits a council Zoom meeting in Cheshire (not that one); he picks the brains of Imperial College Business School meetings expert Sankalp Chaturvedi, and hears from the former Leader of the House of Commons, Sir David Lidington.

Producer: Chris Ledgard

WED 11:30 Mark Steel’s in Town (b09l068v)
Series 8

Ventnor

Mark Steel visits Ventnor on The Isle of Wight and performs at the Winter Gardens, the venue of his first ever gig when he got up and told some jokes in a talent contest on a childhood holiday.

Ventor has a microclimate, subsidence, and the residents claim that on some days they can see France reflected upside down in the sky.

Mark concludes the 8th series of his award winning show that travels around the country visiting towns that have nothing in common but their uniqueness. After thoroughly researching each town, Mark writes and performs a bespoke evening of comedy for the local residents.

Written and performed by … Mark Steel
Additional material by … Pete Sinclair

Production co-ordinator … Hayley Sterling
Sound Manager … Jerry Peal
Producer … Carl Cooper

Picture Credit … Tom Stanier

A BBC Studio production for BBC Radio 4 first broadcast in January 2018.

WED 12:00 News Summary (m000xdps)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4

WED 12:04 Zennor in Darkness by Helen Dunmore (m000xdpv)
Episode 8

Helen Dunmore’s prize-winning first novel is set in the late spring, early summer of 1917. War haunts the Cornish coast and ships are being sunk by U-boats, strangers are treated with suspicion, and newspapers are full of spy stories.

Into this uneasy landscape, to a hamlet just outside St Ives, come DH Lawrence and his German wife, Frieda. They are hoping to escape the war-fever that grips London and also to live as cheaply as possible in a rented cottage. The pacifist Lawrence is reeling from his latest novel, The Rainbow, having been banned for obscenity, and is struggling to finish and publish its sequel, Women in Love.

They befriend Clare Coyne, a young artist who has lived alone with her father since her mother died when she was a child.

Written by Helen Dunmore
Read by Louise Brealey
Abridged by Jill Waters and Isobel Creed
Produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4

WED 12:18 You and Yours (m000xdpx)
News and discussion of consumer affairs

WED 12:57 Weather (m000xdpz)
The latest weather forecast

WED 13:00 World at One (m000xdq1)
Forty-five minutes of news, analysis and comment, with Sarah Montague.

WED 13:45 The Kindness Experiment (m000xdq3)
Good Samaritans

A feel-good series about the kindness of strangers.

WED 14:00 The Archers (m000xd24)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Tuesday]

WED 14:15 Takeover (m000xdq6)
Episode 3

Self-made business mogul Ravi Majumdar risks losing the business empire he has spent a lifetime building, to defeat his enemy and competitor.

Concerned for their inheritance, his four children – Ash the eldest who considers himself the natural heir, Zara the aspiring Bollywood actress, Shaan the least confident who yearns for his father’s attention, and Maya the brilliant student – fight for control of the company and attempt to defeat competition for their father’s affections and fortune.

A fast-paced, globe-trotting family saga of power, revenge and karma with helicopters, private jets and a tiger reserve. Starring Rajit Kapur.

Recorded both in the UK and India.

Cast:
Ravi Majumdar…… Rajit Kapur
Ash……Abhin Galeya
Maya……Amrita Acharia
Zara……Munirih Grace
Shaan……Danny Ashok
Amit……Tavish Bhattacharyya
Ian……Finbar Lynch
Seraphina……Jennifer Armour
Jai……Vincent Ebrahim
Karan……Zafar Karachiwala
Jeet……Ronny Jhutti
Venitia……Laurel Lefkow

All other parts were played by:
Ash Hunter
Philip Desmeules
Emma Carter
Natalie Simpson,
Lola Ogunyemi,
Aseem Hattangady,
Ayeesha Menon
Nadir Khan

With original music by Sacha Puttnam

Written by Ayeesha Menon and Matthew Solon
Sound Design by Eloise Whitmore
Sound recording by Paul Clark, Ashyar Bulsara and Ayush Ahuja
Assistant Producer, Eleanor Mein
Production Assistant, Anna Calandra
Produced by Emma Hearn and Nadir Khan
Director and Executive Producer, John Scott Dryden

A Goldhawk production for BBC Radio 4

WED 15:00 Money Box (m000xdq9)
Paul Lewis and a panel of guests answer calls on personal finance. Producer: Emma Rippon

WED 15:30 All in the Mind (m000xd2d)
[Repeat of broadcast at 21:00 on Tuesday]

WED 16:00 Sideways (m000xdqc)
Matthew Syed explores ideas that shape our lives, making us see the world differently.

WED 16:30 The Media Show (m000xdqf)
Social media, anti-social media, breaking news, faking news: this is the programme about a revolution in media.

WED 17:00 PM (m000xdqh)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day’s headlines.

WED 18:00 Six O’Clock News (m000xdqk)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

WED 18:30 Unite (m000xdqm)
Series 1

The Party and the Proposal

New sitcom series starring Radio 4 favourite Mark Steel (Mark Steel’s in Town, The News Quiz), Claire Skinner (Outnumbered), Elliot Steel and Ivo Graham.

When Tony (Mark Steel), a working class, left wing South Londoner, falls in love and moves in with Imogen (Claire Skinner), an upper middle class property developer, their sons – disenfranchised Croydon rude boy Ashley (Elliot Steel) and Eton and Oxbridge-educated Gideon (Ivo Graham) – are forced to live under the same roof and behave like the brothers neither of them ever wanted.

In this episode, Tony takes Imogen away for a romantic weekend. Gideon and Ashley take the opportunity to have a party at the house, but Gideon’s pet Bearded Dragon suddenly falls ill.

Tony – Mark Steel
Imogen – Claire Skinner
Ashley – Elliot Steel
Gideon – Ivo Graham
Rebecca – Ayesha Antoine
Nigel/Dutch waiter – Simon Greenall
Tamsin – Susannah Fielding
Sarah – Ruth Bratt
Terry the vet – Kevin Eldon
Kevin/Cab driver – Kae Kurd
Marcus/ Protester – Michael Odewale
Stefan/ Rose seller – Naz Osmanoglu
Gabriel – Milo McCabe

Written by Barry Castagnola, Elliot Steel and Mark Steel
(additional material from the cast and Sian Harries)
Executive Producer Mario Stylianides
Producer/Director Barry Castagnola
Sound recordist and Editor Jerry Peal
Broadcast Assistant Sarah Tombling
Production Co-ordinator George O’Regan

Golden Path and Rustle Up production for BBC Radio 4

WED 19:00 The Archers (m000xdqp)
Elizabeth receives a surprising visitor and Lily has a confession to make.

WED 19:15 Front Row (m000xdqr)
Live magazine programme on the worlds of arts, literature, film, media and music

WED 19:45 Two Minutes Past Nine (m000mr5k)
Episode 3: Manual of Hatred

25 years on from the largest domestic terror incident in American history, journalist Leah Sottile and producer Georgia Catt work to understand what made Timothy McVeigh the home-grown terrorist he was – and how that informs what’s unfolding today.

Episode 3: Leah Sottile explores the influence of a man considered America’s most dangerous white nationalist on Timothy McVeigh.

As Leah and Georgia start recording the series in early 2020 the world changed: a global pandemic, calls for racial justice that rang out around the globe, conspiracy theories suddenly going mainstream. Reacting to events as they unfolded, Leah and Georgia didn’t realise quite how relevant and on point it would be to examine the Oklahoma City Bombing right now, at this exact moment in world history. As one journalist tells them: ‘McVeigh would have loved this’.

Recorded over some of the most divisive, turbulent, and quite frankly dangerous feeling months in recent American political history, Two Minutes Past Nine aims to understand the changing face of far right extremism in all its chaos and conspiracism.

Presenter: Leah Sottile
Producer: Georgia Catt
Editor: Philip Sellars

Narration recorded by Joe Preston
Additional Research by Robbie Wojciechowski

WED 20:00 Moral Maze (m000xdqt)
Combative, provocative and engaging live debate chaired by Michael Buerk. With Anne McElvoy, Mona Siddiqui, Matthew Taylor and Ella Whelan. #moralmaze

WED 20:45 Four Thought (m000xdpl)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:30 today]

WED 21:00 Made of Stronger Stuff (p0957q54)
[Repeat of broadcast at 15:30 on Tuesday]

WED 21:30 The Media Show (m000xdqf)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 today]

WED 22:00 The World Tonight (m000xdqx)
In depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective

WED 22:45 Zennor in Darkness by Helen Dunmore (m000xdpv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 today]

WED 23:00 Heidi Regan: No Worries (m000xdqz)
Episode 1

As someone who tends to worry in ‘normal’ times, the pandemic has of course offered some exciting new areas of exploration for the anxious mind. Having a partner who is a GP has both helped and not helped Heidi with that: worrying about her being safe, but also, yay, on tap medical advice! That said, examining rashes of a loved one over dinner isn’t really the romance her partner signed up for. As Heidi and her partner ponder some of the big questions in life, Heidi’s brain resorts, as it always does, to distracting them (and the audience) with increasingly silly jokes as she makes an argument for the pros and cons of joking your way through life.

Written and performed by Heidi Regan.
Production co-ordinator… Caroline Barlow.
Producer…Julia McKenzie
A BBC Studios Production

WED 23:15 The Skewer (m000xdr2)
Series 4

Episode 5

Returning to twist itself into – and remix – the news. Jon Holmes presents The Skewer.

WED 23:30 Today in Parliament (m000xdr4)
News, views and features on today’s stories in Parliament

THURSDAY 01 JULY 2021

THU 00:00 Midnight News (m000xdr6)
The latest news and weather forecast from BBC Radio 4.

THU 00:30 Unfollow by Megan Phelps-Rope (m000xdpn)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Wednesday]

THU 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m000xdr8)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.

THU 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m000xdrb)
BBC Radio 4 presents a selection of news and current affairs, arts and science programmes from the BBC World Service.

THU 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m000xdrd)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.

THU 05:30 News Briefing (m000xdrg)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4

THU 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m000xdrj)
Radio 4’s daily prayer and reflection. Producer: Mo McCullough/Ailsa McIntosh

THU 05:45 Farming Today (m000xdrl)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.

THU 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b020vp4h)
Little Egret

Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs.

Miranda Krestovnikoff presents the Little Egret. The colonisation of the UK by these small brilliant-white herons with black bills and yellow feet, has astonished ornithologists because of its speed.

THU 06:00 Today (m000xfg9)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.

THU 09:00 Across the Red Line (m000xfgc)
Series 6

Has the centrist dad had his day?

Anne McElvoy presents the debate programme which invites two people who disagree on an issue to listen closely to each other’s arguments – and then to find out what drives them.

In each edition, Anne works with one of our two regular conflict resolution specialists, Gabrielle Rifkind and Louisa Weinstein, to foster a more exploratory conversation, to encourage both speakers to probe the values and experiences that underpin each other’s beliefs.

In the first edition of the new series, the journalists Daniel Finkelstein (the Times) and Mary Harrington (Unherd) debate whether, in an age of upheaval, political centrism is obsolete – or more vital than ever. And then Anne and Gabrielle invite each guest in turn to try to discover what drives the other’s viewpoint – and to articulate it back to its holder.

Producer: Phil Tinline

THU 09:30 Metamorphosis – How Insects Transformed Our World (m000sqry)
Jumping Fleas

Dr Erica McAlister of London’s Natural History Museum takes a look at some of the entomological pioneers, whose groundbreaking observations and experiments have led to some truly innovative developments.

She first sets out to examine the jump of the humble flea. Most flea legs average just 3mm and so, without much length, they really don’t have much time to generate energy to push off the ground. So how do these tiny insects achieve jumps of over 20cm? Dame Miriam Rothschild had a life-long fascination with these acrobatic insects. Through intricate dissections of the flea anatomy and innovative high speed filming, she claimed a flea’s jump was not just down to their muscles. Her insights, along with fellow entomologists, have led to discoveries of the most elastic substance in the natural world and a means of acceleration that is fuelling the development of innovative jumping micro robots.

Producer Adrian Washbourne

THU 09:45 Unfollow by Megan Phelps-Rope (m000xfgg)
Episode 4: A Moment of Clarity

Megan Phelps-Roper reads from her brutally frank memoir about growing up in the Westboro Baptist Church – often called ‘the most hated family in America’ – the religious sect aggressive in its homophobia and antisemitism, and notorious for picketing the funerals of American soldiers.

From the age of five Megan was protesting daily, believing that she was doing God’s work. Aged 26, however, Megan came to a realisation: Westboro’s teachings were a monstrous lie and she must leave, turn her back on her family, her church — her entire world – and start over.

Today: Megan is forced to question everything that Westboro stands for – and makes the hardest decision of her life…

Abridged by Sara Davies
Produced by Elizabeth Allard

THU 10:00 Woman’s Hour (m000xfgj)
Women’s voices and women’s lives – topical conversations to inform, challenge and inspire.

THU 11:00 From Our Own Correspondent (m000xfgl)
Insight, and analysis from BBC correspondents around the world

THU 11:30 Written in Scotland (m000xfgn)
Episode 2: Rural Scotland

A four-part series about the relationship that Scotland’s writers have with Scotland itself. Presented by Kirsty Wark. Episode 2 – Rural Scotland.

Scotland’s scenery is a huge part of its appeal, but how writers use the natural world is imbued with politics. Do you depict the countryside realistically or sentimentally and what are the implications of this?

Kirsty Wark hears how JM Barrie paved his way to success with Peter Pan by sentimentalising his rural upbringing for the popular entertainment of a very urban readership. She also hears about Màiri Mhòr, a hugely popular singer and poet, whose sentimental songs about her own past served a different and far more radical political purpose. More recently, Graeme Macrae Burnet’s novel His Bloody Project has revealed the darker side of crofting life in contrast with its romantic image.

With the Highland setting of Outlander captivating audiences around the world, we meet Alasdair MacMhaighstir, (also known as Alexander MacDonald) a real life Jacobite soldier, the Gaelic tutor to Bonnie Prince Charlie and the author of poems which were so rude they were burnt in public by Edinburgh’s public executioner. Even Outlander’s Jamie Fraser would struggle to compete with him.

Producer: Brian McCluskey
A Whistledown Scotland production for BBC Radio 4

THU 12:00 News Summary (m000xfgq)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4

THU 12:04 Zennor in Darkness by Helen Dunmore (m000xfgs)
Episode 9

Helen Dunmore’s prize-winning first novel is set in the late spring, early summer of 1917. War haunts the Cornish coast and ships are being sunk by U-boats, strangers are treated with suspicion, and newspapers are full of spy stories.

Into this uneasy landscape, to a hamlet just outside St Ives, come DH Lawrence and his German wife, Frieda. They are hoping to escape the war-fever that grips London and also to live as cheaply as possible in a rented cottage. The pacifist Lawrence is reeling from his latest novel, The Rainbow, having been banned for obscenity, and is struggling to finish and publish its sequel, Women in Love.

They befriend Clare Coyne, a young artist who has lived alone with her father since her mother died when she was a child.

Written by Helen Dunmore
Read by Louise Brealey
Abridged by Jill Waters and Isobel Creed
Produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4

THU 12:18 You and Yours (m000xfgv)
News and discussion of consumer affairs

THU 12:57 Weather (m000xfgx)
The latest weather forecast

THU 13:00 World at One (m000xfgz)
Forty-five minutes of news, analysis and comment, with Sarah Montague.

THU 13:45 The Kindness Experiment (m000xfh1)
Episode 4

A feel-good series about the kindness of strangers.

THU 14:00 The Archers (m000xdqp)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Wednesday]

THU 14:15 Takeover (m000xfh3)
Episode 4

Self-made business mogul Ravi Majumdar risks losing the business empire he has spent a lifetime building, to defeat his enemy and competitor.

Concerned for their inheritance, his four children – Ash the eldest who considers himself the natural heir, Zara the aspiring Bollywood actress, Shaan the least confident who yearns for his father’s attention, and Maya the brilliant student – fight for control of the company and attempt to defeat competition for their father’s affections and fortune.

A fast-paced, globe-trotting family saga of power, revenge and karma with helicopters, private jets and a tiger reserve. Starring Rajit Kapur.

Recorded both in the UK and India.

Cast:
Ravi Majumdar…… Rajit Kapur
Ash……Abhin Galeya
Maya……Amrita Acharia
Zara……Munirih Grace
Shaan……Danny Ashok
Amit……Tavish Bhattacharyya
Ian……Finbar Lynch
Seraphina……Jennifer Armour
Jai……Vincent Ebrahim
Sharma……Neil D’Souza
Jeet……Ronny Jhutti
John Myson…..Ash Hunter
Ben……Philip Desmeules
Beth Mitchell……Natalie Simpson

All other parts were played by:
Emma Carter
Lola Ogunyemi,
Aseem Hattangady,
Ayeesha Menon,
Nadir Khan

With original music by Sacha Puttnam

Written by Ayeesha Menon and Matthew Solon
Sound Design by Eloise Whitmore
Sound recording by Paul Clark, Ashyar Bulsara and Ayush Ahuja
Assistant Producer, Eleanor Mein
Production Assistant, Anna Calandra
Produced by Emma Hearn and Nadir Khan
Director and Executive Producer, John Scott Dryden

A Goldhawk production for BBC Radio 4

THU 15:00 Open Country (m000xfh5)
Rare British breeds and their owners

Lincoln Longwools, Dorset Horns and Gloucester Old Spot pigs – photographer Amanda Lockhart has been travelling the country looking for rare British breeds. She has approximately 200 markers on her map and is slowly ticking them off. We catch up with her on a very hot day looking for Large Black pigs.
Presented by Helen Mark
Produced by Miles Warde

THU 15:27 Radio 4 Appeal (m000xdry)
[Repeat of broadcast at 07:54 on Sunday]

THU 15:30 Open Book (m000xdsv)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:00 on Sunday]

THU 16:00 The Film Programme (m000xfh7)
Film programme looking at the latest cinema releases, DVDs and films on TV.

THU 16:30 BBC Inside Science (m000xfh9)
A weekly programme that illuminates the mysteries and challenges the controversies behind the science that’s changing our world.

THU 17:00 PM (m000xfhc)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day’s headlines.

THU 18:00 Six O’Clock News (m000xfhf)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

THU 18:30 Talking Story (m000xfhh)
Episode 3

Storyteller Sarah Kendall brings her critically acclaimed live shows to radio

THU 19:00 The Archers (m000xfhk)
Russ unveils a surprise and Elizabeth is honest about her feelings.

THU 19:15 Front Row (m000xfhm)
Live magazine programme on the worlds of arts, literature, film, media and music

THU 19:45 Two Minutes Past Nine (m000mqp0)
Episode 4: Don’t Tread on Me

25 years on from the largest domestic terror incident in American history, journalist Leah Sottile and producer Georgia Catt work to understand what made Timothy McVeigh the home-grown terrorist he was – and how that informs what’s unfolding today.

Episode 4: After he left the army, Timothy Mveigh became steeped in gun shows, conspiracies and government distrust. Leah Sottile investigates that world.

As Leah and Georgia start recording the series in early 2020 the world changed: a global pandemic, calls for racial justice that rang out around the globe, conspiracy theories suddenly going mainstream. Reacting to events as they unfolded, Leah and Georgia didn’t realise quite how relevant and on point it would be to examine the Oklahoma City Bombing right now, at this exact moment in world history. As one journalist tells them: ‘McVeigh would have loved this’.

Recorded over some of the most divisive, turbulent, and quite frankly dangerous feeling months in recent American political history, Two Minutes Past Nine aims to understand the changing face of far right extremism in all its chaos and conspiracism.

Presenter: Leah Sottile
Producer: Georgia Catt
Editor: Philip Sellars

Narration recorded by Joe Preston
Additional Research by Robbie Wojciechowski

THU 20:00 The Briefing Room (m000xfhp)
David Aaronovitch presents in-depth explainers on big issues in the news.

THU 20:30 The Bottom Line (m000xfhr)
Evan Davis chairs a discussion providing insight into business from the people at the top.

THU 21:00 BBC Inside Science (m000xfh9)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 today]

THU 21:30 Across the Red Line (m000xfgc)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 today]

THU 22:00 The World Tonight (m000xfht)
In depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective

THU 22:45 Zennor in Darkness by Helen Dunmore (m000xfgs)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 today]

THU 23:00 Extinction Compendium (m000xfr3)
Comedian (and actual council Waste Education Officer) Jon Long and Biologist Gillian Burke take on green issues in this fast paced new enviro-comedy.

The topic… Plastic. Scourge of the planet, or synthetic scapegoat?

Featuring sketches, songs, and expert interviews. Tonnes of questions, and even one or two answers.

Producer: Jon Holmes
An unusual production for BBC Radio 4

THU 23:30 Today in Parliament (m000xfhw)
News, views and features on today’s stories in Parliament

FRIDAY 02 JULY 2021

FRI 00:00 Midnight News (m000xfhy)
The latest news and weather forecast from BBC Radio 4.

FRI 00:30 Unfollow by Megan Phelps-Rope (m000xfgg)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:45 on Thursday]

FRI 00:48 Shipping Forecast (m000xfj0)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.

FRI 01:00 Selection of BBC World Service Programmes (m000xfj2)
BBC Radio 4 presents a selection of news and current affairs, arts and science programmes from the BBC World Service.

FRI 05:20 Shipping Forecast (m000xfj4)
The latest weather reports and forecasts for UK shipping.

FRI 05:30 News Briefing (m000xfj6)
The latest news from BBC Radio 4

FRI 05:43 Prayer for the Day (m000xfj8)
Radio 4’s daily prayer and reflection. Producer: Mo McCullough/Ailsa McIntosh

FRI 05:45 Farming Today (m000xfjb)
The latest news about food, farming and the countryside.

FRI 05:58 Tweet of the Day (b04mlvyx)
Flightless Cormorant

Tweet of the Day is the voice of birds and our relationship with them, from around the world.

Chris Packham presents the flightless cormorant adapted to its Galapagos world. The isolated Galapagos Islands are famous for their unique wildlife which has evolved to adapt to a landscape free of predators. This absence of predators has allowed the native cormorant to dispense with the need to fly, why waste energy when there’s nothing to fly away from? This is the only flightless member of the cormorant family, which feeds on fish and for that reason it has developed stronger feet for swimming after its prey. They nest on the rocky coasts of Fernandina and Isabela islands and the population can dip below a thousand birds especially after hurricanes or collapses in local fish numbers. They recover quickly though, but are vulnerable to introduced dogs which nearly eliminated the cormorants on Isabela Island.

FRI 06:00 Today (m000xfzt)
News and current affairs, including Sports Desk, Weather and Thought for the Day.

FRI 09:00 Desert Island Discs (m000xdsd)
[Repeat of broadcast at 11:00 on Sunday]

FRI 09:45 Unfollow by Megan Phelps-Rope (m000xg24)
Episode 5: Deadwood

Megan Phelps-Roper reads from her brutally frank memoir about growing up in the Westboro Baptist Church – often called ‘the most hated family in America’ – the religious sect aggressive in its homophobia and antisemitism, and notorious for picketing the funerals of American soldiers.

From the age of five Megan was protesting daily, believing that she was doing God’s work. Aged 26, however, Megan came to a realisation: Westboro’s teachings were a monstrous lie and she must leave, turn her back on her family, her church — her entire world – and start over.

Today: a daring escape for Megan and her sister, and new beginnings…

Abridged by Sara Davies
Produced by Elizabeth Allard

FRI 10:00 Woman’s Hour (m000xg00)
Women’s voices and women’s lives – topical conversations to inform, challenge and inspire.

FRI 11:00 Descendants (p09jjsq5)
Chidi, Than and The Bolton School

Narrated by Yrsa Daley-Ward, the poet and writer introduces us to a network of lives, each one connected in one way or another through the legacy of Britain’s role in slavery.

Chidi grew up in London, and learned at an early age that he was descended from a late 19th Century Nigerian slave trader called Nwaubani Ogogo. He describes how he came to terms with this and the impact racial stereotyping has had on his life, while his history takes us back in time to a moment in the aftermath of the abolition of slavery, when his ancestor still had a license to trade enslaved people. The rush for Africa was beginning; Britain had turned its attention from the slave trade to palm oil. Nwaubani traded both, and was licensed to a British Corporation.

British businesspeople were desperate to gain access to the palm oil which Nwaubani sold. One man in the North West of England had been trying to strike deals in Nigeria – he wanted to be able to control production and prices himself – and his company would eventually buy the corporation which was licensing Nwaubani. But in the meantime, he turned his attention to the Belgian Congo where King Leopold offered him everything he wanted. The man’s name was William Lever – whose company, the Lever Brothers, would eventually become Unilever. Famous across the North of England for his philanthropic endeavours, students and alumni at the school re-founded by him – The Bolton School – are just coming to terms with his legacy. Not technically slavery, but not free labour either.

Producers: Polly Weston, Candace Wilson, Rema Mukena
Editor: Kirsten Lass
Academic consultants: Matthew Smith and Rachel Lang of the Centre for the Study of the Legacies of British Slavery at UCL
Additional genealogical research by Laura Berry

FRI 11:30 Prepper (m000xg03)
Series 2

Queen of the North

Preppers are a large and rapidly growing global community who have taken Armageddon readiness one step further than most. They’re actively skilling up, laying down supplies and readying themselves for ‘the end of the world’, in whatever form it comes. If people in south Manchester are prepping, it’s probably time to worry.

Sylvia Garrett, a cut-throat shop-managing baby boomer, and 27 year old Rachel Olende, self-obsessed and having a quarter-life crisis, continue their podcast for anyone interested in surviving the coming breakdown of society – Prepper.

This week on Prepper, the only podcast that Bear Grylls listens to in the bath, an in-depth examination of the dating scene post-apocalypse, the ups and downs of Faraday Cages – will a tin foil hat suffice? – and a peep inside Sylvia’s “bag of pain”. All this and Rachel’s report into the menace of fly-tipping and its impact on the South Manchester lapwing community.

The first series of Prepper won the Writers Guild of Great Britain Award for Best Comedy 2020.

On this new series: “A comic book and kitchen sink drama” – The Radio Times; “A timely return for the sharply written comedy” – The Guardian; “As enjoyably unhinged as the first series” – Daily Mail.

In this series, while Sylvia continues to broadcast from her well-appointed double garage in south Manchester, Rachel is banished to a duvet-lined gazebo in the garden. It’s secure against COVID but, sadly, not against the rain.

Cast:
Sylvia is played by Sue Johnston OBE
Rachel is played by Lydia West

Written by Caroline Moran
Technical Presentation: Jerry Peal
Producer: Steve Doherty

A Giddy Goat production for BBC Radio 4

FRI 12:00 News Summary (m000xg2j)
National and international news from BBC Radio 4

FRI 12:04 Zennor in Darkness by Helen Dunmore (m000xg07)
Episode 10

Helen Dunmore’s prize-winning first novel is set in the late spring, early summer of 1917. War haunts the Cornish coast and ships are being sunk by U-boats, strangers are treated with suspicion, and newspapers are full of spy stories.

Into this uneasy landscape, to a hamlet just outside St Ives, come DH Lawrence and his German wife, Frieda. They are hoping to escape the war-fever that grips London and also to live as cheaply as possible in a rented cottage. The pacifist Lawrence is reeling from his latest novel, The Rainbow, having been banned for obscenity, and is struggling to finish and publish its sequel, Women in Love.

They befriend Clare Coyne, a young artist who has lived alone with her father since her mother died when she was a child.

Written by Helen Dunmore
Read by Louise Brealey
Abridged by Jill Waters and Isobel Creed
Produced by Jill Waters
A Waters Company production for BBC Radio 4

FRI 12:18 You and Yours (m000xg09)
News and discussion of consumer affairs

FRI 12:57 Weather (m000xg0c)
The latest weather forecast

FRI 13:00 World at One (m000xg0f)
Forty-five minutes of news, analysis and comment, with Edward Stourton.

FRI 13:45 The Kindness Experiment (m000xg0j)
Episode 5

After a week of talking to people and asking them to carry out an act of kindness, reflections on how it’s gone and how it’s made them feel.

FRI 14:00 The Archers (m000xfhk)
[Repeat of broadcast at 19:00 on Thursday]

FRI 14:15 Limelight (p09h4wvx)
The System

The System – Level 6: Judgement Day Question Mark.

By Ben Lewis.

A witty and propulsive six-part thriller about a group of young radicals and the hunt for their leader. Starring Siena Kelly, Jack Rowan and Iain de Caestecker.

Level 6: Judgement Day Question Mark

The Past: Alex’s story comes into focus.
The Present: Maya goes in search of Jake, hoping together they can stop the System before things get totally out of control. But can they? And who’s really in charge?

Cast:
Alex … Iain de Caestecker
Maya … Siena Kelly
Coyote…Divian Ladwa
Beau…Matthew Needham
DI Cohen / Jess …Chloe Pirrie
Jake …Jack Rowan

Original music and sound design by Danny Krass
Featuring tracks from Equiknoxx music collective

A BBC Scotland Production directed by Kirsty Williams
With thanks to Dr Joel Busher at the Centre for Trust, Peace and Social Relations, University of Coventry.

FRI 14:45 Chinese Characters (b0b01vgy)
Hong Xiuquan v Zeng Guofan: The Duellists

This was the duel that shaped China. Hong Xiuquan was a poor boy who went into a trance and became convinced he was Jesus’s younger brother, with a mission to conquer China. Zeng Guofan was a loyal Confucian bureaucrat who rose up the imperial hierarchy. In the mid-19th century, Hong’s visions led him to launch a war under the name “Taiping” – heavenly kingdom of great peace. He created a quasi-state in some of China’s richest heartlands, run on Christian principles, imposed on pain of death. The ruling house sent in Zeng to beat the rebels. The result was one of the bloodiest, most savage civil wars in Chinese history, shaped by the rivalry between two men, one set to conquer China, and one to save the old regime.
Presenter: Rana Mitter
Producer: Ben Crighton
Researcher: Elizabeth Smith Rosser.

FRI 15:00 Gardeners’ Question Time (m000xg0q)
GQT at Home

Kathy Clugston hosts this week’s gardening Q&A with her panel of experts – Pippa Greenwood, Matthew Wilson and Matt Biggs. Together they answer questions emailed by listeners.

Producer – Jemima Rathbone
Assistant Producer – Millie Chu

A Somethin’ Else production for BBC Radio 4

FRI 15:45 From Fact to Fiction (m000xg0v)
John Godber brings his wit and his gimlet eye to Radio 4, in this fictional response to a story in the week’s news.

Godber is one of Britain’s most popular and prolific playwrights, ‘hilarious and heart-breaking’, whose unique talent is to make you laugh uproariously and in the same breath feel like you’ve been punched in the belly. A champion of Yorkshire talent and culture, he has won many awards and his plays are performed all over the world.

Producer…Mary Ward-Lowery

FRI 16:00 Last Word (m000xg0z)
Matthew Bannister tells the life stories of people who have recently died, from the rich and famous to unsung but significant. Prod: Eleanor Garland (Beverley Purcell Apr-July)

FRI 16:30 More or Less (m000xdpj)
[Repeat of broadcast at 09:00 on Wednesday]

FRI 17:00 PM (m000xg14)
Afternoon news and current affairs programme, reporting on breaking stories and summing up the day’s headlines.

FRI 18:00 Six O’Clock News (m000xg1d)
The latest national and international news from BBC Radio 4.

FRI 18:30 Dead Ringers (m000xg1j)
Series 21

Episode 4

The writing squad for the series: Tom Jamieson and Nev Fountain, Laurence Howarth, Tom Coles & Ed Amsden, Jeffrey Aidoo, Simon Alcock, James Bugg, Sarah Campbell, Nastassia Dhanraj , Athena Kugblenu, Sophie Dickson, Rajiv Karia, Vivienne Riddoch & Jane Mccutcheon , Edward Tew.

Producer: Bill Dare
Production Coordinator: Sarah Sharpe
A BBC Studios Production for Radio 4.

FRI 19:00 Front Row (m000xg1n)
Live magazine programme on the worlds of arts, literature, film, media and music

FRI 19:45 Two Minutes Past Nine (m000ms05)
Episode 5: The Second April 19th

25 years on from the largest domestic terror incident in American history, journalist Leah Sottile and producer Georgia Catt work to understand what made Timothy McVeigh the home-grown terrorist he was – and how that informs what’s unfolding today.

Episode 5: How standoffs at Waco and Ruby Ridge became flash-points for Timothy McVeigh.

As Leah and Georgia start recording the series in early 2020 the world changed: a global pandemic, calls for racial justice that rang out around the globe, conspiracy theories suddenly going mainstream. Reacting to events as they unfolded, Leah and Georgia didn’t realise quite how relevant and on point it would be to examine the Oklahoma City Bombing right now, at this exact moment in world history. As one journalist tells them: ‘McVeigh would have loved this’.

Recorded over some of the most divisive, turbulent, and quite frankly dangerous feeling months in recent American political history, Two Minutes Past Nine aims to understand the changing face of far right extremism in all its chaos and conspiracism.

Presenter: Leah Sottile
Producer: Georgia Catt
Editor: Philip Sellars

Narration recorded by Joe Preston
Additional Research by Robbie Wojciechowski

FRI 20:00 Any Questions? (m000xg1s)
Carolyn Harris MP, Simon Hart MP, Professor Patrick Minford, Liz Saville-Roberts MP

Chris Mason presents political debate and discussion from the Queen’s Hall in Narberth with the Deputy Leader of Welsh Labour Carolyn Harris MP, the Secretary of State for Wales Simon Hart MP, Professor of Applied Economics at Cardiff University Patrick Minford and Plaid Cymru’s Westminster Leader Liz Saville-Roberts MP.
Producer: Camellia Sinclair
Lead broadcast engineer: Simon Tindall

FRI 20:50 A Point of View (m000xg1w)
Weekly reflections on topical issues from a range of contributors.

FRI 21:00 Archive on 4 (b078mvwj)
Tennant Looks Back At Osborne

Sixty years ago, one small play shocked British theatre to its core and started a cultural revolution. John Osborne, a writer from an unfashionable Midlands city, put ordinary lives on stage and made them an extraordinary comment on post-war Britain. As he prepares to star in a new production for Radio 4, David Tennant explores John Osborne’s own papers to uncover how he put his own life and relationships into Look Back in Anger.

Along the way, we look back at the anger which greeted the play from many critics. The BBC’s theatre critic Ivor Brown called it, “unspeakably dirty and squalid. It is difficult to believe that a colonel’s daughter, brought up with some standards, would have stayed in this sty for a day.” He went on to fume, “I felt angry because it wasted my time.” He was one of many who hated the play.

David Tennant hears interviews with John Osborne, reads his personal letters, as well as archive of critic Kenneth Tynan and director Tony Richardson. He also plays extracts from previous productions, including a classic with Richard Burton as Jimmy Porter.

Contributors include playwright David Hare, critic Michael Billington, and actors Gary Raymond and George Devine.

Producer: Jo Wheeler
Executive Producer: David Morley
A Bite Media production for BBC Radio 4

FRI 22:00 The World Tonight (m000xg1y)
In depth reporting, intelligent analysis and breaking news from a global perspective

FRI 22:45 Zennor in Darkness by Helen Dunmore (m000xg07)
[Repeat of broadcast at 12:04 today]

FRI 23:00 A Good Read (m000xf13)
[Repeat of broadcast at 16:30 on Tuesday]

FRI 23:30 Today in Parliament (m000xg20)
Today in Parliament

News, views and features on today’s stories in Parliament


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